Saskatoon Public Library  
     
  Prairie Gold:
Sports Heroes From Saskatchewan
 
 
Photo 1 of 5. | | |

Paul Acoose

Paul Acoose is a Saulteaux from the Sakimay reserve and was born in 1883 "when the saskatoons bloom". His gift of running was inherited from his father, Samuel Acoose, and grandfather, Qwewitch, both of whom were hunter's of exceptional speed and endurance.

Paul started to run competitively in his late teens as an amateur at the local sport days in the Grenfell area. In 1908 he became the three and five mile road champion, and the five mile track champion of Western Canada. On July 1, 1908, in the city of Regina, Paul came first in a 10.5 mile race in 1:04:06, which was more than 8 minutes ahead of Saskatchewan's best runners. In that same year, at the Labour Day Manitoba Championships in Winnipeg, he finished first in the five mile event in 27:34.

In April, 1909, Paul turned professional. He ran his first race as a pro on May 17, 1909 against the English runner, Fred Appleby and finished the 15 mile race first in the world record time of 1:22:22. On March 12, 1910, at Madison Square Gardens in New York, he placed second in a 20 mile race against a top international field. Paul's last professional race was March 30, 1910 in Toronto, where he defeated Tom Longboat in a 12 mile race.

Paul returned to the Sakimay Reserve to raise a family of 9 children with his wife, Madeleine Osoup. He farmed, tended cattle, was an avid gardener and would walk or run long distances to visit friends and family. Paul was also a band councilor for a number of years and attended many local Pow-wows as a respected grass dancer. He lived for 95 years, until his death in 1978.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Indian First Nations Sports Hall of Fame.


As an amateur, Paul Acoose was the champion of Western Canada in the three and five mile running events. On July 1, 1908 he won a 10.5 mile race in Regina eight minutes ahead of the other runners.

Paul Acoose turned professional in April 1909 and won an indoor 15 mile race at Winnipeg in world record time. In March of the following year, he came second in a 20 mile race at Madison Square Gardens.

On March 30, 1910, Paul defeated the celebrated runner Tom Longboat in a 12 mile race in Toronto.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

No photo currently available. If you have a photo to donate, contact the Local History Room at 306.975.7578 or lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca.

Subject: .

Comment on this record: lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca

Copyright notice
Photo 2 of 5. | | |


Alex Wuttunee Decotea

Alex Wuttunee Decoteau

Alex Wuttunee Decoteau was born in December, 1887 on the Red Pheasant Reserve, located south of the North Saskatchewan River. He attended the Battleford Industrial School and learned to play such sports as boxing, cricket and football (soccer). The death of his father on February 3, 1891 would cause Alex to remain in school, and later to live with his sister and brother-in-law in Edmonton.

Alex's first race was a one-miler at Fort Saskatchewan on May 24, 1909 in which he came second. On June 29, 1909, Alex won his second competitive race, which was a five-mile feature at the Edmonton Exhibition. Two days later in Lloydminster Alex set a new Western Canadian record in the same event in 27.45.2. Alex would go onto win numerous races throughout Alberta and Saskatchewan. On July 1, 1910 Alex entered the Alberta Provincial Championships in Lethbridge and emerged victorious in the four events he entered - the five mile, the two mile, the one mile, and the half mile. At the Montreal AAA grounds Alex defeated the field in the 5000 meter event, in the time of 15.17.4 to become the only Saskatchewan or Alberta athlete to qualify for the 1912 Olympic games m Stockholm, Sweden. In Stockholm he finished sixth in the 56000 m final. He experienced severed leg cramps early in the final. Alex continued to run after the Olympics and set two Alberta provincial records in the one and two mile events on July 1, 1914.

Beyond Sport Alex:

- Became a member of the Edmonton Police Department in 1909 and is recognized as the first full-blooded Aboriginal person to join a municipal police force in Canada.

- Was promoted to Sergeant on April 11, 1914 and was in charge of the No.4 Police Station on 102 Avenue and 121 Street.

- Has the distinction of being one of the 1st motorcycle policeman in Edmonton.

- He was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame.

-In 1916 he joined the 200th Sportsman Battalion and was later transferred to the 49th Edmonton Regiment. On the 30th of October, 1917 Alex Wuttunee Decoteau was killed at the Battle of Passchindaele by a sniper's bullet. He was 30 years old.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Indian First Nations Sports Hall of Fame.

Date: c1930

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the Saskatchewan Federation of Indian Nations

Subject: .

Comment on this record: lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca

Copyright notice
Photo 3 of 5. | | |


Cyprian Enweani

Cyprian Enweani

Cyprian got hooked on running all because of Diane-Jones Konihowski. Cyprian heard her speak after the 1976 Montreal Olympics. That dedication carried him to the top. He was a member of the Canadian team that went to the Seoul Olympics in 1988. In three consecutive heats Cyprian set three Saskatchewan records. His best time in the 200 metre was 20.57 seconds in the semi-final, 9th best in the world. He was also a member of the 4 x 100 metre relay team which finished 7th.

Enweani started running at the age of twelve. In 1981 he was on the Saskatchewan Canada Games team and the following year set records in the 200 and 400 metre at the Provincial high school meet. By 1983 he was a member of Canada's national team and helped his country place fourth in the 4 x 100 metre relay at the Pan-American Games. He has also competed in the Canadian and World Student Games, Commonwealth Games and the World championships. Indoors he holds every sprint record in the province from the 50 to the 300 metres.

In 1988 he was named Kinsmen Athlete of the Year. He received his Medical Degree in June 1989 and was inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1989.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

Copyright information: University of Saskatchewan

Subject: .

Comment on this record: lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca

Copyright notice
Photo 4 of 5. | | |

Rover Forsyth

In 1905 distance running was a premier sport in Saskatchewan and none excelled at this sport the way a young man from Caron did. This youth was "Rover" Forsyth who had been born in Ontario but who was making his mark as a track star in Southern Saskatchewan and in Manitoba.

Mr. Forsyth's name was synonymous with winning road races. He won the Regina standard 10 mile race in 1910, 1911 and 1912, the Moose Jaw Times 10 mile race in 1909, 1910 and 1911. Showing no favors he also won the Moose Jaw News race three times. He won the Winnipeg Telegram road race in 1910 and 1911. As a result of this latter win "Rover" was selected to travel to Stockholm, Sweden, to represent Canada in the 1912 Olympics. He was sixteenth in the marathon at Stockholm.

During World War I Mr. Forsyth competed in numerous allied service meets, including the Inter-allied Games in Paris, as a Canadian representative.

Following the War he competed in track and field events in both Canadian and Saskatchewan championships. In addition to his running he won championships in the discus and pole vault.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22, 1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

No photo currently available. If you have a photo to donate, contact the Local History Room at 306.975.7578 or lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca.

Subject: .

Comment on this record: lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca

Copyright notice
Photo 5 of 5. | | |

We hope that you have enjoyed reading about some of Saskatchewan's sports heroes.

If you have a photograph of someone or a team listed in Prairie Gold that we do not have a photo for and are willing to donate it, please contact us.

Due to their nature and sometimes ambiguous origin the photographs seen here and those on file at the Local History Room are continuously being updated with new information. Some of this information comes from dedicated research done by Local History staff. However some of the biggest 'breaks' have come from the public... Those that remember the people, places and events in the photo are our biggest informational resource and we ask that if you have any information about the photos to contact the Local History Room at lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca or phone (306) 975-7578.

Come and visit the Local History Room the next time you are at the Frances Morrison Library.

Thank you.

Comment on this record: lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca

Copyright notice
 
For more sports photographs and information search the Local History Collections database.
Prairie Gold Menu About Local History Ordering a Photograph
 
Saskatoon Public Library