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  Prairie Gold:
Sports Heroes From Saskatchewan
 
 
Photo 1 of 85. | | |

George Abel

An outstanding stickhandler and playmaker, Melville-born George Abel was a member of the national hockey team that captured an Olympic hockey gold medal for Canada during the 1952 Winter Games in Oslo, Norway. Abel's fans called him "Mr. Production" because he centered a line that scored a majority of the team's points during a 51-game international tour that included the Olympics Games. The Canadian National Team went on to win the gold medal, recording seven wins and one tie. The United States finished second and Sweden took third.

Late in 1951, the Olympic-bound Edmonton Mercury hockey team lured 35 year-old Abel away from Melville where he played for the newly reorganized Millionaires, a Saskatchewan Intermediate "A" hockey team. Except for the 1951-52 season, he was a mainstay with the Millionaires. The team took the Saskatchewan "A" championship in three straight seasons, 1948 to 1950, and Abel was awarded the league's scoring title three times. He became the Millionaires' player/coach after a season with the club and continued these duties until his retirement from the club in 1956. The team secured a fourth Saskatchewan Intermediate "A" championship that year.

Before 1951, Abel was offered positions on a number of hockey teams, including the Streatham professional hockey club in England, the Detroit Red Wings' farm team in Indianapolis, and the Maple Leafs in Lethbridge. Earlier, he had played two seasons with the Flin Flon Bombers. Despite breaking his collar-bone early in the 1937-38 season, he reappeared during the playoffs to help the team capture the 1938 Saskatchewan Senior Hockey Championship.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and Museum on June 19, 1993.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 2 of 85. | | |


Robert Adams

Robert Adams

Born in Alsask in 1924, Bob was an outstanding track and field athlete, competing at the Saskatchewan, Canadian and international levels. He held the Canadian senior men's discus record from 1947 to 1952. In 1952, his decathlon record of 6638 points earned him a spot on the Canadian Olympic team that competed in Helsinki. Adams also represented Canada in the Commonwealth Games in 1954 in Edmonton.

He has also served as a coach on the local, Canadian and international levels and was appointed to the officials team for the 1976 Montreal Olympics and the 1978 Commonwealth Games. Adams served as president of the Saskatchewan Track and Field Association and the Saskatchewan High School Athletic Association. He was a member of the Technical Advisory Committee when Saskatoon hosted the Canada Winter Games in 1971.

Bob earned the city of Saskatoon Merit Award, the city of Saskatoon Jubilee Award, the Confederation of Canada Centennial Medal in 1967, and the Kinsmen Sportsman of the Year Award in 1972. In 1975 he was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and in 1986, the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

Date: 1945

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 3 of 85. | | |

Leslie Anderson

Born in 1940, Les Anderson has put Saskatchewan up front in the sport of archery. He is the first inducted archer in our hallowed halls.

In 17 years he has accumulated amazing records. Beginning in 1963 with the Regina Frontier Bowmen and the Wascana Archers, Anderson started collecting accolades. At the local club level he won 35 medals, provincially he collected 29 firsts and seconds, and nationally, he won Canadian Indoor and Outdoor Championships.

Anderson became a "B" card carrying athlete in 1974 and by 1976 he was on the National Team for Olympic and World target trials.

Internationally, Anderson has travelled afar - from Montana to Florida, from Yugoslavia to Phoenix to San Juan, Puerto Rico, collecting medals and awards.

In 1978 he represented Canada in World Field Championships in Geneva and an International Meet in France.

Les Anderson is a Certified National Coach and Official, and was 1977 coach of the archery team at the Canada Games. He has provincially chaired national outdoor championships as well as aiding administratively at a provincial and national level.

Les Anderson, representing a minority sport, has given archery as much as a man can give - our sincere congratulations.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame on June 14th, 1986.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 4 of 85. | | |

Dennis Beerling

Dennis has been involved in sport as an official, coach and administrator, devoting time to Softball and Track and Field. With 20 years as a coach in softball, Dennis has guided teams to five provincial championships and with the 1979 Bar K Junior Ladies, a trip to the nationals. Dennis has also been a registered umpire for over 15 years and has served on numerous boards and leagues in fostering softball both locally and internationally.

Dennis has received numerous awards in recognition of his contribution: Award of Excellence in 1982 and Outstanding Service recognition in 1978 from Canadian Amateur Swimming Association and 1981 from the Saskatchewan Amateur Softball Association. In Track and Field, Dennis has been coaching for 25 years along with officiating for 20 years including Olympics, Commonwealth Games and World Student Games duty. He has been involved with numerous other ventures, Saskatchewan Games; Western Canada Games; Sask. Sport; and National Coaching Certificate program.

Dennis was the Saskatoon Kinsmen Sportsman in 1982 and awarded the 100th century award as a builder also in 1982. He was named to the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 5 of 85. | | |

Calvin Bricker

Winner of many Canadian championships, he dominated broad jumping and the triple jump in Canada for close to two decades.

Perhaps the earliest record of merit that we have of Calvin D. Bricker is when he set an intercollegiate record at Toronto in 1916 of 22' 3" which stood as such until 1939.

Bricker was, one of Canada's greats of track and field, and was the only Canadian ever to place within the first six in an Olympic game in this event. In the 1908 Olympic games in London he placed third with a jump of 23' 3" and in the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm he gained second place with a jump of 23' 81/2", an open record until the famous champion, Jesse Owens broke it in Hamilton on 16th September, 1933 with a jump of 24' 73/4", and as a native record until the middle thirties.

At time of installation citation read October 31, 1966.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 6 of 85. | | |

1924 Canadian Olympic Track & Field Team

Competitors at the Canadian Olympic Track and Field trials, Montreal, June 1924. Among them is Saskatoon's Eddie Mather who represented the province of Saskatchewan in the Olympic trials but was not chosen for the team, possibly because of age. Names handwritten on back of original photo, are attached. Athletes, each with different crest, are seated in front of bleachers.

Date: June 1924.

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Photo 7 of 85. | | |

Ether Catherwood

Ethel was born in Hannah, North Dakota on April 28th, 1908. Her parents had homesteaded near Scott, Saskatchewan in 1906. They journeyed from Hannah to Scott a few times before finally settling permanently in Scott in May 1910. As a student at Champagne school in Scott, Ethel won her first high jump competition leaping 3 feet 10 inches in a meet at Wilkie.

Then the Catherwood family moved to Saskatoon in 1925, Ethel participated in baseball, basketball and track and field. With Joe Griffiths as her coach, Ethel set her sights on competing at the 1928 Olympics. After setting a world record in the high jump in Regina, she went to the Amsterdam Olympics and won the gold medal with a leap of 5 feet 2 9/16 inches. While Saskatoon referred to her as the Saskatoon Lily, Ethel was named the prettiest athlete (beauty prize) of the 1928 Games by a New York correspondent.

She was named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 1955, the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1966 and the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

Date: 1928.

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Photo 8 of 85. | | |

Brian Clark

Brian Clark's ability as a coach at the Saskatchewan grassroots level has led him down some international trails.

He was the Canadian junior coach in a meet against France and England in 1979, Pan-American junior coach in 1978, Pan-American coach in sprints and hurdles in 1980 and Olympic team coach in hurdles for the 1984 Games at Los Angeles.

A school teacher by profession, Clark first taught track and field at Choiceland, later in Saskatoon and served as head coach of the Riversdale Kiwanis Track and Field Club from 1969 until 1989.

He has been events coordinator for hurdles and relays in Saskatchewan for a dozen years.

He has coached at the Western Canada Games in 1979, 1983 and 1987 and at the Canada Games at St. John's, Newfoundland, in 1977, at Sudbury in 1981 and at St. John, N.B. in 1985.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 9 of 85. | | |


Alex Wuttunee Decotea

Alex Wuttunee Decoteau

Alex Wuttunee Decoteau was born in December, 1887 on the Red Pheasant Reserve, located south of the North Saskatchewan River. He attended the Battleford Industrial School and learned to play such sports as boxing, cricket and football (soccer). The death of his father on February 3, 1891 would cause Alex to remain in school, and later to live with his sister and brother-in-law in Edmonton.

Alex's first race was a one-miler at Fort Saskatchewan on May 24, 1909 in which he came second. On June 29, 1909, Alex won his second competitive race, which was a five-mile feature at the Edmonton Exhibition. Two days later in Lloydminster Alex set a new Western Canadian record in the same event in 27.45.2. Alex would go onto win numerous races throughout Alberta and Saskatchewan. On July 1, 1910 Alex entered the Alberta Provincial Championships in Lethbridge and emerged victorious in the four events he entered - the five mile, the two mile, the one mile, and the half mile. At the Montreal AAA grounds Alex defeated the field in the 5000 meter event, in the time of 15.17.4 to become the only Saskatchewan or Alberta athlete to qualify for the 1912 Olympic games m Stockholm, Sweden. In Stockholm he finished sixth in the 56000 m final. He experienced severed leg cramps early in the final. Alex continued to run after the Olympics and set two Alberta provincial records in the one and two mile events on July 1, 1914.

Beyond Sport Alex:

- Became a member of the Edmonton Police Department in 1909 and is recognized as the first full-blooded Aboriginal person to join a municipal police force in Canada.

- Was promoted to Sergeant on April 11, 1914 and was in charge of the No.4 Police Station on 102 Avenue and 121 Street.

- Has the distinction of being one of the 1st motorcycle policeman in Edmonton.

- He was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame.

-In 1916 he joined the 200th Sportsman Battalion and was later transferred to the 49th Edmonton Regiment. On the 30th of October, 1917 Alex Wuttunee Decoteau was killed at the Battle of Passchindaele by a sniper's bullet. He was 30 years old.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Indian First Nations Sports Hall of Fame.

Date: c1930

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the Saskatchewan Federation of Indian Nations

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Photo 10 of 85. | | |

Phyllis Dewar

While still a school girl in Moose Jaw, Phyllis Dewar dominated all tree style swimming events in Saskatchewan. In fact, in 1934 when she travelled west to the British Empire and Commonwealth Games trials she was already the three-time one mile swimming champion of Saskatchewan. At the trials, however, Miss Dewar was a "prairie unknown". This did not stop her from swimming onto the team and to the Games in London, England.

Meeting the best in the empire at London, Phyllis won four medals (the best performance by any Canadian) as a result of her victories in the 100 yard free style (a new record) and in the 440 yard free style (a new record) and her participation as a member of the medley relay team and the 400 yard relay team, both of which were Canadian first place victories.

In August of this same summer Miss Dewar swam her way to the Canadian women's one mile swimming championship in Toronto, to win the Barker Gold Trophy. She completed the mile race in 29 minutes, 41 seconds. These performances were instrumental in her selection as the Canadian Women Athlete of the Year in 1934.

In 1935 Miss Dewar, set a new record at each of 100 yards, 400 yards, 1,000 yards, 1,500 yards, and set a mile record of 23 minutes and 32 seconds.

Phyllis was a member of the 1936 Canadian Olympic swimming team.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22,1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 11 of 85. | | |

Clarence Downey

For 26 years, from 1932 to 1958, Clarence was involved with speed skating. For many years he was a participant, then turned his energies to coaching. Clarence was also a proficient barrel jumper. He was the Western Canadian champion in 1936 and appeared in many shows throughout the West.

In 1943, he took coaching very seriously and he and others formed the Saskatoon Speed Skating club. As its president the club began to grow, and competitive skating returned to the province and Clarence was known as "Mr. Speed Skating" in Saskatchewan. He wrote many articles on coaching and skating. His pamphlet "Helpful Hints on Speed-Skating", was published by the CCM company. Because of his coaching skills he was selected as coach and manager of the 1956 Canadian Olympic Speed-Skating team.

He was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1967. In 1986 he was inducted into the Saskatoon Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.


Clarence Downey over a period of 26 years (1932-58) was active in the sport of speed skating, first as a participant and later and more importantly as a teacher and coach of the sport.

By 1936 Downey was the barrel jumping champion of Western Canada. However, it wasn't until 1943 that his organizational and coaching ability came to the forefront. It was in that year he and others organized the Saskatoon Speed Skating Club. A year later he was its President and within a year competitive speed skating had returned to the province. This had come about largely through his untiring efforts. For the next 14 years, until the time of his death, Clarence Downey was "Mr. Speed Skating" in Saskatchewan.

He wrote training programs, articles on training hints and exercise charts for local use. As well he wrote a coaching booklet which was distributed nationally. Much of his writings became the impetus which caused speed skating to grow both in numbers of participants and in importance in the province.

His excellence as a coach and administrator was recognized by his selection by the Canadian Olympic Association as coach and manager of the 1956 Canadian Olympic Speed Skating team.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22, 1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

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Photo 12 of 85. | | |

Diana Duerkop

Diana Duerkop was born in Kingston, Ontario, in 1941. She was active in high school basketball, track, volleyball and badminton programs and YWCA programs.

She attended Queen's University for four years, swimming and playing intercollegiate basketball for four years.

Diana came to Saskatoon in 1963 at a time when the University of Saskatchewan was designing its aquatic programs to suit the new pool. She ran swimming programs and coached the university's synchronized swimming teams for five years.

She returned to University as a student, graduated in education and became a teacher at Nutana where she coached senior girls' basketball, twice winning provincial titles.

She led the revival of synchronized swimming in Saskatchewan and became president of the Canadian association for a three-year term, starting in 1978.

Diana was named women's team manager for Canada at the Pan-American Games in Venezuela in 1983; assistant chef d'mission for the Pan-American Games in Indianapolis in 1987; and chef d'mission for the Pan-American Games in Havana, Cuba, in 1991.

She enjoyed an eight-year term on the Canadian Olympic Association's executive committee and remains aquatic director for the Canadian Olympic Association.

She owns Westsport Consulting; her husband, John, is principal at Evan Hardy Collegiate and as a teacher, he shares her beliefs in the community and in youth.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 13 of 85. | | |


Maureen DuWors

Maureen DuWors

Maureen has represented Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and Canada in track and field as an athlete, coach and administrator. During her career, she held many Saskatchewan, high school and open records in the 50, 60, 75, and 100 yard sprints. She was also the holder of the Canadian Juvenile long-jump record. Her strong showing in these events helped Maureen make the Canadian team that went to Melbourne, Australia for the 1956 Olympics. She competed in the 100 and 200 metre sprints and the 4 x 100 metre relay team.

While competing in the 4 x 100 relay in the 1958 Commonwealth Games and the 1959 Pan-American Games, she helped Canada win two bronze medals. When her racing days were over Maureen turned to coaching and officiating.

She became an internationally ranked official and served as a director of the Saskatoon Track and Field club, an executive member of the Amateur Athletic Association of Canada, and was a founding member of Sask Sport.

She was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1977 and in 1986 entered the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.


As an athlete, coach, official and administrator, Maureen Duwors has represented Saskatchewan, and Canada, in track and field.

In 1953 Maureen held both the open and high school junior sport titles. In 1955 she was a Canadian champion in the 60 yard and 100 yard events. Throughout the course of her career as an active athlete, Maureen held the Canadian Record for the 50 yard, 60 yard and tied the 100 yard sprint events, as well as the Canadian Juvenile Long Jump record.

In 1956, at the Melbourne Olympics, Maureen ran the 100 metres, 200 metres and the 4x100 metre relay. Maureen held two bronze medals for the 4x100 relay from the Pan American games and the British Empire and Commonwealth Games.

An active participant in sport, Maureen went on to become an official, administrator and internationally rated official. She was an executive member of the Athletic Association of Canada, Saskatchewan branch; a director of the Saskatoon Track and Field Club and was a founding member of Sask Sport.

At time of installation citation read March 26, 1977.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 14 of 85. | | |


Richard DuWors

Richard DuWors

Builder

Richard DuWors, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, graduated from Bates College in Maine and Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Dick joined the University of Saskatchewan in 1957 as head of the Sociology Department. Considered to be the father of track and field at the University, he was an outstanding cross country and track and field coach who developed many fine student-athletes who went on to become leaders in track and field. Among this group were Lyle Sanderson and Dale Yellowlees. He motivated all of his student-athletes to excel both on and oft the track.

He started the University's indoor track and field program with very little equipment and limited training facilities. His vision and drive led to the construction of an indoor track in 1965 which allowed indoor track and field to grow and develop in the province during the winter months. He improvised when it came to training in gymnasiums by utilizing training corners.

He was responsible for the formation of the first Canada West track and field championship held in 1968 and was also instrumental in bringing the first indoor national championship to Saskatoon in 1969. He also played a prominent role in bringing a number of national outdoor championships to Saskatoon such as the 1960 Olympic Games Trials and the 1967 Pan American Games Trials.

His knowledge and work in track and field led to his appointment to serve on the National Fitness and Amateur Sport Advisory Board.

His vision and dream of a field house for Saskatoon became a reality when the Saskatoon Field House opened as part of the Western Canada Summer Games in 1979.

Dr. DuWors passed away unexpectedly in 1979. The Canada West's men's track and field championship trophy is named in honour of Dr. DuWors.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.


Richard (Dick) DuWors was born in Boston, graduated from Bates College in Maine and Harvard University. He came to Saskatoon in 1957 as head of the Sociology Department of the University of Saskatchewan.

Dick was an outstanding cross country coach with the university and started the university's indoor track program with very little equipment and limited training facilities. It was through his leadership that indoor corners were developed for training purposes and that an indoor track was constructed in 1965. He was one of the founders of the Saskatchewan Jubilee Games in 1965, an event which was inherited by the Knights of Columbus the following season. He also started the Western Intercollegiate indoor championships in 1967.

He was also on committees which brought the 1960 Olympic Games trials and the 1967 Pan-American Games trials to Saskatoon.

Dick's great dream was the pursuit of a Field House for year-round track and field training and his dream came true with the completion of the Saskatoon Field House in time for the 1979 Western Canada Summer Games, just before his unexpected death in August, 1979.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 15 of 85. | | |

Robert Ellard

Like many other sport builders, Bob Ellard began his association with rowing as an athlete, winning gold at the local, provincial, regional and national levels. As a Master athlete, he captured gold at the World Masters Games in 1985.

Ellard's contribution to the sport of rowing in Regina began upon his arrival in 1977. He had previously been active in the Winnipeg Rowing Club. Instrumental in the rebuilding of the Regina Rowing Club, Bob has coached the club every year since 1977 at all levels introductory to elite. His students have included Tony Zasada, Rob Currie, Ellen Gillies and Audrey Mowchenko; all of whom have represented Canada in international competition.

Bob has made countless contributions at the provincial level. In 1978 he established an annual regatta on Wascana Lake - the Regina Sprints Regatta - organizing and running the event for over 10 years. Since 1988, Bob has worked to develop the Regina Rowing Club Masters Program, making the sport accessible to a wider range of people and also founded the Canadian Masters Summer Sports Festival. While President of the Saskatchewan Rowing Association, a post he held three times, he was a founder of the Prairie Rowing Association. As Chair of the Saskatchewan Technical Committee, Ellard developed the basic training approach for athletes at the provincial level and was the Saskatchewan coach at four Western Canada Summer Games (1979-1990) and three Jeux Canada Games.

Nationally, Bob was elected to the executive of the Rowing Canada Aviron (R.C.A.) in 1982 and has contributed to its Board for over 14 years, serving as President in 1986/87. Ellard has served as an 'A' Director for the Canadian Olympic Association from 1990 to 1993 and was responsible for Canada's rowing team at the 1984 Olympics. As Chair of the Technical Committee for the R.C.A. he developed a technical plan to improve the competitive performance of our national teams and the results can be seen in the progressively improving results of Canadian rowers at the Olympic Games. Bob was named Technical Advisor for the Jeux Canada Games in 1985 and 1989 and was instrumental in establishing High Performance Training Centres in London, Ontario and Victoria, B.C.. Internationally, Bob has represented Canada at the FISA (Federation Internationale Society d'Aviron) Congress and four World Championships.

Recognition of Bob Ellard's enormous contribution to Saskatchewan and Canadian rowing have included the Sask Sport Volunteer of the Year award in 1988 and the following Rowing Canada Aviron awards: 1981 Coach of the Year; 1988 Executive of the Year; 1988 Centennial Medal; 1989 President's Award and the 1990 Award of Merit.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 16 of 85. | | |


Cyprian Enweani

Cyprian Enweani

Cyprian got hooked on running all because of Diane-Jones Konihowski. Cyprian heard her speak after the 1976 Montreal Olympics. That dedication carried him to the top. He was a member of the Canadian team that went to the Seoul Olympics in 1988. In three consecutive heats Cyprian set three Saskatchewan records. His best time in the 200 metre was 20.57 seconds in the semi-final, 9th best in the world. He was also a member of the 4 x 100 metre relay team which finished 7th.

Enweani started running at the age of twelve. In 1981 he was on the Saskatchewan Canada Games team and the following year set records in the 200 and 400 metre at the Provincial high school meet. By 1983 he was a member of Canada's national team and helped his country place fourth in the 4 x 100 metre relay at the Pan-American Games. He has also competed in the Canadian and World Student Games, Commonwealth Games and the World championships. Indoors he holds every sprint record in the province from the 50 to the 300 metres.

In 1988 he was named Kinsmen Athlete of the Year. He received his Medical Degree in June 1989 and was inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1989.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

Copyright information: University of Saskatchewan

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Photo 17 of 85. | | |

Adam Faul

As one of Saskatchewan's outstanding boxers, Adam Faul had an enviable record of winning 60 of 64 bouts.

His impressive list of championships began in 1946 and by 1948 he reached a highlight of his career when he represented Canada at the London Olympics.

In 1946 Adam won the Saskatchewan light heavyweight title. A year later he held both the Canadian light heavyweight title and the provincial heavy weight championship. He won the Canadian heavy weight championship in both 1947 and 1948, and was winner of the Western Canadian diamond belt in 1948.

Adam's unbeaten record ended in his second bout at the 1948 Olympics in his fight against Nils Nilsson of Sweden.

At time of installation citation read March 27, 1976.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 18 of 85. | | |

Rover Forsyth

In 1905 distance running was a premier sport in Saskatchewan and none excelled at this sport the way a young man from Caron did. This youth was "Rover" Forsyth who had been born in Ontario but who was making his mark as a track star in Southern Saskatchewan and in Manitoba.

Mr. Forsyth's name was synonymous with winning road races. He won the Regina standard 10 mile race in 1910, 1911 and 1912, the Moose Jaw Times 10 mile race in 1909, 1910 and 1911. Showing no favors he also won the Moose Jaw News race three times. He won the Winnipeg Telegram road race in 1910 and 1911. As a result of this latter win "Rover" was selected to travel to Stockholm, Sweden, to represent Canada in the 1912 Olympics. He was sixteenth in the marathon at Stockholm.

During World War I Mr. Forsyth competed in numerous allied service meets, including the Inter-allied Games in Paris, as a Canadian representative.

Following the War he competed in track and field events in both Canadian and Saskatchewan championships. In addition to his running he won championships in the discus and pole vault.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22, 1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 19 of 85. | | |

Ron Friesen

Diving (B.A.(P.E.) '72)

Ron Friesen graduated from Central Collegiate in Moose Jaw and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1967.

In 1968-69 he won both WCIAA 1 metre and 3 metre titles. At the CIAU championships that same year he captured the 1 metre and 3 metre titles. Following the meet he was selected Canadian College Diver of the Year. In 1969-70 and 1970-71, he repeated his accomplishments of 1968-69 including being selected Canadian College Diver of the Year. For two of those years, he received the Howard Nixon trophy as the outstanding male athlete at the University of Saskatchewan.

While a student at the University, he represented Canada at the 1970 British Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Scotland, where he won a bronze medal in springboard and finished 6th in high tower. That same year, he competed at the World Student Games in Turin, Italy where he finished 12th despite having sustained an injury. In 1971, he represented Canada at the Pan American Games in Cali, Colombia and returned to Canada to make a clean sweep at the Canadian championships winning the 1 and 3 metre springboard events and the 10 metre tower event. Later that year, Ron was named Athlete of the Year for the City of Saskatoon.

To cap off his diving career, in 1972 Ron represented Canada in the 3 metre springboard and 10 metre tower events at the Olympic games in Munich, Germany.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Date: 1967-1972.

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Photo 20 of 85. | | |


Clarence Garvie

Clarence Garvie

Clarence was a teacher, administrator and coach in Saskatoon for over 30 years. He was also a very good athlete and at the University of Saskatchewan was a member of eight varsity teams which earned him a major athletic award. Much of his energy was devoted to the Saskatchewan High Schools Athletic Association. He was its president in 1952-53 and in 1960 received its award of merit.

He has been associated with the Hilltop Track club which later became the Saskatoon Track club. He served as president of the Hilltop Football club and was chairman of the wrestling committee for the 1971 Canada Winter Games. He gave freely of his time for the Knights of Columbus Indoor Games by producing the printed programs. As a nationally rated track and field official, he officiated at the pole vault event at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.

Clarence was named Kinsmen Sportsman of the Year in 1978, elected to the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1980 and inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

Date: 1934

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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