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  Prairie Gold:
Sports Heroes From Saskatchewan
 
 
Photo 1 of 10. | | |

Clarence Bligh

Clarence Bligh, the founding chairman of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, had a wide and varied career in amateur sport.

As an active participant, he earned a number of provincial boxing and wrestling junior heavyweight championships. In Saskatchewan's jubilee year - 1955 - he is credited with being one of the major forces in attracting the amateur finals in boxing, wrestling and track and field to the province.

During his career with the Regina City Police, he was active in the promotion of Little League baseball in Regina and was also President of the Police Curling and Sports Association.

His contribution to amateur sport earned him the position of President of the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada (Saskatchewan branch) from 1951 to 1955. He was President of the A.A.U. of Canada in 1960.

Clarence Bligh was also involved with the promotion and development of lawn bowling in Regina and the province. In 1949 and again in 1954 he held the office of President of the Saskatchewan Lawn Bowling Association.

In 1972 he was elected President of the Canadian Lawn Bowling Council and was general chairman of the 1973 lawn bowling national championships which were staged in Regina.

In time of Installation citation read March 27,1976.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 2 of 10. | | |


Hugh Carson

Hugh Carson

Builder (1926-1953)

Hugh Carson was born in Scotland and emigrated to Canada in 1923.

"Hughie" joined the University of Saskatchewan in 1926 on a part-time basis as soccer coach and athletic trainer. In 1937 he joined the Physical Education Department as a full-time teacher, coach and trainer. During his 27 years he devoted countless hours to the athletic success of the Green and White. He looked after the health and welfare of countless athletes with fervent passion. He took great pride in coaching soccer, fencing and boxing. He was known as a morale booster and a temendously supportive figure in University of Saskatchewan athletics.

Upon his retirement in 1953, the Physical Education Department commended him for his "integrity, forthrightness and quiet kindliness".

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Date: 1940

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 3 of 10. | | |

Gas Eichel

Gas Eichel is Saskatchewan-born and raised and except for a tour of duty in the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War II and a brief period spent in Ontario, he has lived in the province all his life.

Defeating major illnesses as a youth he built a frail heart and body into the physique of a champion. He also defeated the depression as an amateur boxer when there was no money for training and a proper diet and little more for equipment and travel but a time when there were large numbers of outstanding boxers in the amateur ranks.

In a boxing career extending over 14 years from 1931-45, Gas Eichel fought 47 bouts in which he won 41 and 12 of these by knockouts. He lost only three times. Included in this record were two Canadian light-heavy weight championships. Five Saskatchewan light-heavy weight championships, one Interprovincial championship and one R.C.A.F. championship.

Gas Eichel retired following World War II and as a news report of the day stated - "there are no more Opponents for the fists of Gas Eichel".

In addition to his boxing accomplishments, it should be noted that Gas Eichel has additionally made very significant contributions to the development of the sport of archery and to the work of the Boy Scout Movement in Saskatchewan.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22,1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 4 of 10. | | |

Adam Faul

As one of Saskatchewan's outstanding boxers, Adam Faul had an enviable record of winning 60 of 64 bouts.

His impressive list of championships began in 1946 and by 1948 he reached a highlight of his career when he represented Canada at the London Olympics.

In 1946 Adam won the Saskatchewan light heavyweight title. A year later he held both the Canadian light heavyweight title and the provincial heavy weight championship. He won the Canadian heavy weight championship in both 1947 and 1948, and was winner of the Western Canadian diamond belt in 1948.

Adam's unbeaten record ended in his second bout at the 1948 Olympics in his fight against Nils Nilsson of Sweden.

At time of installation citation read March 27, 1976.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 5 of 10. | | |


Milton Harradence

Milton Harradence

Tennis, Boxing (L.L.B. '49)

Milton Harradence graduated from high school in Prince Albert and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1945. During his five years on campus, he competed in tennis and boxing.

An outstanding middleweight boxer, Milt was on the intervarsity boxing team for three years. As a boxer, he led the University of Saskatchewan to two Intervarsity Assault-at-Arms victories. Hugh Carson described Milt Harradence as one of the top middleweights to represent the University of Saskatchewan in boxing competitions.

As a tennis player, he competed at both the interfaculty and intervarsity level. He captured singles and doubles titles while competing for the University of Saskatchewan. In 1946-47, Milt was part of the WCIAA championship team that travelled to McGill University for the unofficial Canadian Universities Championship.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 6 of 10. | | |

Hank Hartenberger

The Hartenberger family immigrated to Canada from Poland when Hank was only a year and a half old. They moved to Weyburn in 1937 and Hank has lived there ever since, making a huge contribution to the city over the past 58 years. His interest in boxing began while serving in the army and R.C.A.F. during World War II. Later, he competed at the Olympic boxing trials in 1956, the same year he was named Saskatchewan Middleweight Champion.

For over 40 years, Hartenberger has been a boxing organizer and coach in Weyburn, promoting over 100 boxing cards and developing an equal number of provincial champions. Many of these provincial champions have gone on to compete and win medals at the national level, such as Morgan Williams, Kerry Fahlman, Dean Marr, Kelly Nelson, Don Grant, Tony Bouchard and Dennis Leys. In addition to boxing, Hank also worked with young track & field athletes. He operated a track & field club in Weyburn for seven years in the 1950s, coaching such stand-outs as Emmett Smith and Helen Metchuk.

While working out of his Soo Line Boxing Club in Weyburn, Hank was six times named the coach of the Saskatchewan boxing team that represented the province at Canadian championships.

A highlight of Hank's coaching career came in 1975 when, as the coach of Saskatchewan's boxing team for the Canada Winter Games, he witnessed six of the nine boxers from the province win medals - 1Gold, 2 Silver and 3 Bronze - and three of those boxers were from his club in Weyburn.

Hartenberger has served on the Saskatchewan Amateur Boxing Association Board of Directors for over 25 years and continues to do so, presently acting as 2nd vice-president. In 1980 and 1981, Hank was named to the Board of Directors of the Canadian Amateur Boxing Association.

Hank Hartenberger was inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991 and was only the second person to be made a life member of the Saskatchewan Amateur Boxing Association, the first being Ken Goff. He was named Saskatchewan Boxing Coach of the Year in 1988 and Zone 1 Coach of the Year in 1990.

Known nationally and internationally as a fair and honest man who is dedicated to his sport, his students and his city, Hank Hartenberger has influenced hundreds of young people over the years and they freely admit that their success in sport, and in life, is a direct result of the time they spent as a youth under the guidance, leadership and nurturing of Hank Hartenberger.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 7 of 10. | | |

Ernest Herlen

Born in Star City, Saskatchewan in 1918, Ossie Herlen was an outstanding sportsman but excelled in boxing. He started to box at the age of fifteen. All told he had 33 fights and won 27 of them, 12 via the knockout route. Of the six fights he lost, five were by decision. In his nine years of boxing, Herlen was never knocked out.

In 1937 Ossie was the Saskatchewan lightweight champion. The following year he was Saskatchewan champion again, this time in the welterweight division. That same year he was a finalist in the Canadian welterweight class. For most of his career, Herlen was trained by the great Bobby Reid. In the 1937-38 year, Ossie was vice-president of the Golden Gloves Amateur Boxing club. In 1940, as a member of the RCAF, Ossie continued boxing and won the Toronto Garrison championship.

He was named to the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1977 and was inducted into the Saskatoon Hall of Fame in 1987.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.


Ernest Osborne (Ossie) Herlen was an excellent boxer and a great sportsman of the late thirties. He was raised in Saskatoon and started to box at the age of fifteen.

Of his 33 fights, Ossie won 12 by decision, 12 by knockouts and three by T.K.O.'s. He lost five by decision and fought to one draw. In the nine years of boxing he was never knocked out.

Ossie was the Saskatchewan lightweight champion in 1937 and in 1938 was a Saskatchewan champion again, only this time in the welterweight class. He was also the Welterweight Dominion Champion in Winnipeg the same year.

Ossie was named Vice President of the Golden Gloves Amateur Boxing Club for 1937-38.

After entering the R.C.A.F., Ossie carried on boxing and took the Toronto Garrison Championship in 1940.

At time of installation citation read March 26, 1977.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

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Photo 8 of 10. | | |

Bobby Reid

Bobby Reid was born in 1890 in Hamilton, Scotland and has been active in sport ever since coming to Saskatoon in 1913.

From 1914 to 1926, he played soccer with the Saskatoon Thistles, the CNR soccer club, and the Fifth Battalion soccer club. In 1916, he boxed for and was also the physical instructor for the 96th Highlanders. His next 16 months were spent in the employ of the New York America's hockey team as trainer and physio-therapist. Upon returning to Saskatoon in 1935, Bobby was active as a player, coach, trainer, manager, and administrator of many local sports until his recent retirement. This activity included involvement with boxer Ozzie Herlen, Golden Gloves Boxing Club, Theatricles Soccer Club, Saskatoon Thistles Soccer Club, Maymount Rangers, Saskatoon Hearts Soccer Club, Legion Soccer Club, Saskatoon Ahepa Soccer Club, Gems Girls Fastball Team, Saskatoon Hilltops Amateur Football Junior Team, Adilman Aces Basketball Team, and the Saskatoon Commodores Amateur Baseball Team.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on March 24,1979.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 9 of 10. | | |

Claude Carl Warwick

Claude was only 17 years old when he punched his way to the Canadian Amateur Featherweight title in 1941, his 29th straight victory. He was also Canadian Navy Champion - winning was his way. Until his promising career was cut short in a tragic accident, Claude had a total of 51 bouts - winning 50 with 1 draw.

For the first time in the history of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, a family of athletes is honoured: Five members of the famous Warwick family - Grant, Bill, Dick, Claude (deceased), and Mille. They represent boxing, hockey and ladies softball. This unique family have to their credit six Canadian championships and three World titles. In the difficult years 1930-40, this colourful and athletic family were blessed with talent, enthusiasm and a fighting spirit. They were motivated to excel and reach the highest pinnacles of success in sport.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 10 of 10. | | |

We hope that you have enjoyed reading about some of Saskatchewan's sports heroes.

If you have a photograph of someone or a team listed in Prairie Gold that we do not have a photo for and are willing to donate it, please contact us.

Due to their nature and sometimes ambiguous origin the photographs seen here and those on file at the Local History Room are continuously being updated with new information. Some of this information comes from dedicated research done by Local History staff. However some of the biggest 'breaks' have come from the public... Those that remember the people, places and events in the photo are our biggest informational resource and we ask that if you have any information about the photos to contact the Local History Room at lhstaff@saskatoonlibrary.ca or phone (306) 975-7578.

Come and visit the Local History Room the next time you are at the Frances Morrison Library.

Thank you.

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