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  Prairie Gold:
Sports Heroes From Saskatchewan
 
 
Photo 1 of 32. | | |

Robin Hahn

Robin Hahn of Belle Plaine has been associated with horses all his life. He rode his first pony two miles to school and back, and in the 1940's competed at horse shows in and around Regina.

In 1950 he bought "Colette", which he took east to train with the three-day event team. Although Robin and Colette did not compete in the 1956 Olympics in Stockholm, Robin travelled with the team and played an important role as a groom and assistant trainer. The Canadian Team won the Bronze medal. In Winnipeg in 1967, on a horse called "Warden" Robin placed fifth at the Pan American Games. In the 1968 Olympics in Mexico he was Canada's leading rider, placing ninth overall, on a horse called "Taffy".

In 1971 he was the captain of the Gold Medal Team at the Pan-American Games in Cali, Columbia.

Having taken on the responsibility of co-ordinating the three-day event at the pre-Olympics in 1975, Robin was appointed captain of the Canadian Olympic Team to ride at Bromont in 1976. He competed on a horse called "L'Esprit".

Robin Hahn has served the sport as a Director and Zone Chairman of the National Equestrian Federation of Canada, and both as an F.E.I. and a Canadian Horse Show Association Judge. He has worked with the Canadian Coaching Association, and was the National Testing Chairman of the Canadian Pony Club for several years.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, Sept 13, 1980.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 2 of 32. | | |

Glenn Hall

Glenn Hall's hockey career extended over four decades. Born on October 3, 1931, he was raised in Humboldt and began playing hockey there. Glenn tended goal from an early age, playing with the Humboldt Indians (1947-49), then with the Windsor Spit fires (1949-51). His professional debut was with the Indianapolis Capitols (1951-52) and next the Edmonton Flyers (1952-55). "Mr. Goalie", as he became known, began his 16 season NHL career with the Detroit Red Wings in 1955. After two seasons, he was traded to the Chicago Black Hawks where he spent 10 seasons. With the NHL's expansion in 1967, he went to the St. Louis Blues. Interestingly, this inductee played all but his last three years in goal without a mask.

Glenn's player statistics, records and awards reflect his skill as a goalie. His career points against average was 2.51 and he played in a total of 11 All-Star games. This inductee holds NHL records for the most consecutive-games (502) as a goaltender and has held the record for most Stanley Cup games (113) in that position. In his rookie year, he received the Calder Trophy, being judged the most proficient first year player. In six seasons, he led the NHL in shutouts and three times received the Vezina Trophy for having recorded the least number of goals against. In 1961, Glen was part of the Chicago Black Hawks' Stanley Cup champion team. Later in the 1968 Stanley Cup in which his team lost, Glenn received the Conn Smythe Trophy as the outstanding player for his team in post-season play; only 11 of 151 shots passed him in the 4 game series.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and Museum on June 15, 1991.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 3 of 32. | | |

Jack Hamilton

The "Builder in Athletics" usually plays many executive roles and Jack Hamilton is the personification of this statement.

As an executive member, Jack was associated with baseball and hockey teams in Southern Saskatchewan as well as acting on a Western Canadian rugby football rules committee for six years, and as a member of the Canadian Olympic Committee for 17 years and as a governor of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League.

Jack Hamilton was the president of the Saskatchewan Amateur Hockey Association 1926-27, the Saskatchewan Branch of the A.A.U. of Canada 1928, Canadian Amateur Hockey Association 1931-32, the Saskatchewan Amateur Basketball Association 1933-34, and A.A.U. of Canada 1937-38. It should be noted that to date only one other person has held the Presidency of both the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association and the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada.

His efforts on behalf of others have been recognized by his life membership in the Saskatchewan Hockey Association, buy his coronation medal awarded by King George VI and by his recognition by the province of Saskatchewan during the 1955 Jubilee Celebration and by his selection in 1967 as the Regina Optimist Club Senior Sportsman.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22, 1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 4 of 32. | | |

Richard Hammond

Hammy, as he was called by friends, qualified twice to represent Canada at the Olympics. He placed third in the 220 yds. event, second in the long jump and first in the triple jump at the 1912 Canadian Olympic trials in Montreal. A repeat performance at the 1920 Olympic trials again qualified Hammy to represent Canada. However, on both occasions another athlete was selected to attend the Games.

At the provincial level, he captured the all round track and field title at the 1911 Saskatchewan championships and was the winner of the Robin Hood sports field day the same year.

He was the all-round provincial champion in 1913 and 1918. In 1915 he was awarded the Sam Moore Cup for the all-round title in track and field.

Hammy's activities were not restricted to track and field. He played with the Regina Bees hockey team when it won the Saskatchewan championship in 1912 and was a member of the 1914 Allan Cup winners - The Regina Vics.

At time of Installation citation read March 27,1976.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 5 of 32. | | |


Evan Hardy

Evan Hardy

Builder 1916-1953

Evan Hardy came to the University of Saskatchewan from Iowa State University in 1917. He was professor and head of the agricultural engineering department for thirty-one years.

Besides being an outstanding scholar, Evan Hardy coached, managed and, on occasion, played with the Huskie football team during the 1920's. He was a long time president of the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Rugby Union and in 1929 he donated the Hardy Cup for W.C.I.A.U. football competition (today to the W.I.F.L. champions). Professor Hardy was a long-time member of the men's Athletic Board and from 1930 to 1951 he volunteered his time as timekeeper and scorer for Huskie football games.

In addition to serving his University, Evan Hardy spent many years serving as secretary and/or president of both the Canadian Rugby Union and the Saskatchewan Rugby Union.

In 1957 the University of Saskatchewan awarded Evan Hardy an Honorary Doctorate of Laws Degree.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Date: 1946

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 6 of 32. | | |


Milton Harradence

Milton Harradence

Tennis, Boxing (L.L.B. '49)

Milton Harradence graduated from high school in Prince Albert and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1945. During his five years on campus, he competed in tennis and boxing.

An outstanding middleweight boxer, Milt was on the intervarsity boxing team for three years. As a boxer, he led the University of Saskatchewan to two Intervarsity Assault-at-Arms victories. Hugh Carson described Milt Harradence as one of the top middleweights to represent the University of Saskatchewan in boxing competitions.

As a tennis player, he competed at both the interfaculty and intervarsity level. He captured singles and doubles titles while competing for the University of Saskatchewan. In 1946-47, Milt was part of the WCIAA championship team that travelled to McGill University for the unofficial Canadian Universities Championship.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 7 of 32. | | |

Gerald Harris

Football BAPE'73, BEd'74

Gerry Harris graduated from Luther College in Regina and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1969.

Gerry was a member of the Huskie football team for five years serving as co-captain for two years. A versatile player, he played a number of positions on the team- tight end, linebacker, and quarterback. He also served as the team's punter during his five year career.

He was twice selected a Canada West All Star and a CIAU All-Canadian as a Tight End in 1972. He led the league and team in number of passes caught in 1972.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame

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Photo 8 of 32. | | |

Stanley Harrison

Saskatchewan's most distinguished builder of the sport of Thoroughbred Racing, Captain Harrison is recognized for his contributions as a breeder, trainer, writer and race official.

Capt. Harrison had his first winner racing in 1913 and Harrison-Breds were still winning in 1976.

A sculptor, painter and writer of note, Captain Harrison used his talent to capture the spirit of his thoroughbreds for the enjoyment of countless followers of the Equestrian arts. As an expert on bloodstock, his articles appeared in racing and breeding journals throughout the world. Harrison's volume of verse and drawings "Gentleman - the Horse" is now a collector's item. Captain Harrison judged at horse shows throughout the west, spent many years as Saskatchewan's director of the Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society, served as a steward at Assiniboia Downs in 1958. He was a founding director of the Prairie Thoroughbred Breeders Association.

July 1, 1976 at Marquis Downs in Saskatoon, the first running of "The Captain Stanley Harrison Stakes" took place. It was a fitting tribute to a man whose accomplishments stand as an inspiration to all of us.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on April 1, 1978.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 9 of 32. | | |

Hank Hartenberger

The Hartenberger family immigrated to Canada from Poland when Hank was only a year and a half old. They moved to Weyburn in 1937 and Hank has lived there ever since, making a huge contribution to the city over the past 58 years. His interest in boxing began while serving in the army and R.C.A.F. during World War II. Later, he competed at the Olympic boxing trials in 1956, the same year he was named Saskatchewan Middleweight Champion.

For over 40 years, Hartenberger has been a boxing organizer and coach in Weyburn, promoting over 100 boxing cards and developing an equal number of provincial champions. Many of these provincial champions have gone on to compete and win medals at the national level, such as Morgan Williams, Kerry Fahlman, Dean Marr, Kelly Nelson, Don Grant, Tony Bouchard and Dennis Leys. In addition to boxing, Hank also worked with young track & field athletes. He operated a track & field club in Weyburn for seven years in the 1950s, coaching such stand-outs as Emmett Smith and Helen Metchuk.

While working out of his Soo Line Boxing Club in Weyburn, Hank was six times named the coach of the Saskatchewan boxing team that represented the province at Canadian championships.

A highlight of Hank's coaching career came in 1975 when, as the coach of Saskatchewan's boxing team for the Canada Winter Games, he witnessed six of the nine boxers from the province win medals - 1Gold, 2 Silver and 3 Bronze - and three of those boxers were from his club in Weyburn.

Hartenberger has served on the Saskatchewan Amateur Boxing Association Board of Directors for over 25 years and continues to do so, presently acting as 2nd vice-president. In 1980 and 1981, Hank was named to the Board of Directors of the Canadian Amateur Boxing Association.

Hank Hartenberger was inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991 and was only the second person to be made a life member of the Saskatchewan Amateur Boxing Association, the first being Ken Goff. He was named Saskatchewan Boxing Coach of the Year in 1988 and Zone 1 Coach of the Year in 1990.

Known nationally and internationally as a fair and honest man who is dedicated to his sport, his students and his city, Hank Hartenberger has influenced hundreds of young people over the years and they freely admit that their success in sport, and in life, is a direct result of the time they spent as a youth under the guidance, leadership and nurturing of Hank Hartenberger.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 10 of 32. | | |


Lois Haslam

Lois Haslam

Basketball, Swimming, T & F B.Sc. '37

Lois Haslam graduated from Havergal College in Toronto and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1933.

Lois was a member of the track team for three years, the basketball team for two years and the swim team for one year. In 1934-35, as a member of the swim team, she placed second in individual scoring and received her 'Senior Color.' As a three-year member of the track and field team she placed in the top three in events she entered. As a member of the basketball team she excelled at the guard position. Lois was the second woman to be awarded a Major Athletic award.

In addition to athletics, Lois was very active in other extracurricular activities. She was Secretary of the Women's Athletic Directorate for two years and became president in 1936-37. She was a member of the Students Representative Council and active in Pente Kai Deka.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Date: 1936

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 11 of 32. | | |


Phyllis Haslam

Phyllis Haslam

Swimming (B.Sc. '34)

Phyllis Haslam graduated from Haverhill College in Toronto and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1930.

During her four years (1930-34) at the University of Saskatchewan, she captured four individual championships and broke several inter-varsity records. She led the intervarsity team to four consecutive championships.

While a student at the University she broke the Canadian record in the 100 yards breast stroke and also lowered the mark for 220 yards.

At the 1934 British Empire Games trials in Hamilton, Ontario, she set a new World Record for 100 yards, 1.18 3/10, and a new British Empire time of 253.00 for 200 yards breast stroke. At the British Empire Games in London, England, Miss Haslam placed second and won a silver medal in the 200 metres. She swam the breast stroke of the 3x100 yard medley relay event in which the Canadian team won a gold medal.

Phyllis Haslam was installed into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1974 and received the prestigious title of Officer of the Order of Canada in 1978.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.


Phyliss Haslam attended the University of Saskatchewan, 1931-34 and trained in a small pool on the campus. She showed her ability as a swimmer in 1931 when she placed second in a Provincial Mile Championship for the Wm. Wrigley Trophy. The next year she set a new Canadian record for the 100 yard breast stroke and also lowered the mark for 220 yards. Her time of 3.20 2/5 was faster than either Canadian or American records.

At the British Empire Games in Hamilton, Ontario, 1934 she set a new World Record for 100 yards, 1.18 3/10, and a new British Empire time of 253.00 for 200 yards breast stroke. At the B.E. Games in London, England, Miss Haslam placed second and won a silver medal. She swam the breast stroke of the medley relay event in which the Canadian team won and received gold medals.

Attending the University of Toronto, 1935-36, Miss Haslam competed in inter-faculty swim meets and continued to set a number of new records showing a high calibre of ability for a girl who started training in a pool 45 feet by 20 feet.

At time of installation citation read March 22, 1975.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 12 of 32. | | |

Bill Hay

Bill Hay played his earliest days of hockey at "Rink #3", a lighted outdoor rink in Regina's Lakeview area. While attending Lakeview School and Central Collegiate, Hay enjoyed playing with a variety of hockey teams. Some years, he played for more than one team at a time. One season, he was with the Central Gophers Hockey Team, a team within the Regina Pats organization and another in the Regina Parks League. He had, and still has, a tireless love for the game.

In 1952, Hay attended his first year of university at Regina College and played for the Regina Pat Juniors. The following year, he transferred to the University of Saskatchewan where he played centre for the Huskies. During the 1954-55 season, he returned to Regina to work for the Tide Water Oil Company and again play for the Regina Pat Juniors. The team went to the Memorial Cup and lost out to the Toronto Marlboroughs. The following year, Hay began a three year study stint with a full hockey scholarship at Colorado College. While at Colorado, he was known as one of the Tigers top players, scoring a total of 58 college career goals and 90 assists.

Hay first became a professional in 1958 when he played for the Calgary Stampeders of the Western Hockey League, a professional league one level below the National Hockey League. His 24 goals, 30 assists and aggressive play with the "Stamps" impressed the Chicago Black Hawks. The Hawks paid the Montreal Canadians $25 000 for Hay's rights and asked him to join what would become known as their "Million Dollar Line," made up of Bobby Hull, former Regina Pat Murray Balfour, and Hay. At this point, Hay had reached a U.S. College hallmark as the first American graduate to make it to the NHL.

The 1959-60 NHL season proved very successful for Hay; he was awarded the Calder Trophy as the NHL's outstanding rookie player and given a place on the NHL's All-Star team. The following season, he became the Hawk's top scorer and led the team to a Stanley Cup victory. He was again named an All-Star that year. While Hay's 388 NHL career points (506 games, 113 goals, 273 assists) demonstrate his proficiency in hockey, another side of his career is often overlooked. Consistently, he was willing to help other players put the puck in the net. While playing with the Black Hawks, he said, "My big job is to get the puck to them in front of the net. My ambition is to keep Bobby [Hull] and Murray [Balfour] scoring goals."

Hay began working for Bow Valley Resources of Calgary when he left the NHL and became head of their international oil drilling operations. Yet, his heart did not leave hockey. Hay was president of Hockey Canada in 1991 and in 1992 became president of the Calgary Flames.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 13 of 32. | | |

Charles Hay

Hockey and Football (B.E. '25, L.L.D. '65)

Charles Hay graduated from Saskatoon Collegiate Institute (Nutana) and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1922. He starred for four years with both the Huskie football and hockey teams.

His career highlights included the first-ever Saskatchewan inter-varsity football victory over the University of Alberta in 1922. In his final year he was elected captain of the team.

The 1922-23 hockey team had an outstanding season. Led by Charlie Hay, the team captured the city, intervarsity, provincial and Western Canadian Senior Hockey Championships. The team advanced to the Allan Cup final only to lose to the Toronto Granites. He served as captain of the hockey team during his entire four-year career.

While a student at the university, he served on the Athletic Directorate for two years. After leaving the university he served for several years as Alumni representative on the Men's Athletic Board. He later served on the University's Senate and on the Board of Governors.

The University of Saskatchewan awarded him an Honorary Doctorate of Laws Degree in 1965.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Date: 1922?

Photographer: Dill, Ralph.

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Photo 14 of 32. | | |


James Hay

James Hay

Football, Hockey (B.E. '50)

Jim Hay graduated from Central Collegiate in Regina and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1947. Like his father, Charlie, before him, Jim excelled in both hockey and football at the University of Saskatchewan and graduated from the College of Engineering.

Jim played with the Huskie football team for three years where he established himself as a fierce competitor. He served as captain of the team during his final year.

He starred with the Huskie hockey team for three years and served as captain of the team during his final year. Throughout his career, he either led or finished in the top four in team scoring.

He was awarded a Block 'S' Award in 1947-48, received his Senior colours in 1949 and was awarded a Major Athletic Award in 1950.

While a student on campus he served on the Men's Athletic Board for two years.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 15 of 32. | | |

Elmer Hazzard

Elmer Hazzard has the distinction of being the first water skier residing in Saskatchewan to win a medal in a national water ski event.

He started water skiing in 1960. In 1970, his first year of competitive skiing, he won the Regina Beach open trick skiing event and the Stoney Lake overall title. The following year he won three trick events, at the Saskatchewan Open, the Stoney Lake tournament and at Crooked Lake. He was the Saskatchewan senior men's overall champion in both 1972 and 1973.

It was in 1973, at Chrysler Lagoon near Upper Canada village in Ontario, that Elmer won the Canadian senior men's tricks championship. He retained the championship in 1974 in Hull, Quebec.

Elmer Hazzard has served the sport unselfishly by judging. coaching and running clinics. He also served as vice-president of both the Saskatchewan Water Ski Association and the Regina Water Ski Club. He has two sons, Blaine and Greg, both of whom have attained prominence in water skiing, and a daughter, Arlene, who has been a member of the Saskatchewan Water Skiing Team.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame on March 22, 1980.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 16 of 32. | | |

Eugene Hearn

Eugene Hearn was born in Odessa, Saskatchewan, in 1929. He moved to Saskatoon at an early age, played hockey and became involved in speed skating because the rink was virtually across the street.

He was a charter member of the Saskatoon Club in 1942 and among his souvenirs is a first-place certificate for the 440 yards in the Saskatoon speed skating championships of 1944. He was a member of a 1947 Lions Club team that included future Olympians Craig Mackay and Johnny Sands.

He was appointed coach of the Lions Speed Skating Club in 1956 and he was coach of the Saskatchewan team at the first Canada Winter Games held in Quebec City in 1967.

Eugene was secretary-treasurer and president of the Saskatchewan Amateur Speed Skating Association in the 1950s and, later in 1988, returned to the provincial executive as vice-president of officials.

He has officiated at a number of world events, including the Canada Cup in Regina. During the 1980s, he was chief starter at the men's all-round championships in Hammar, Norway, chief starter for the world junior championships in Quebec City in 1986, and chief starter at the women's championships at Milwaukee in 1987. He was also an official at the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary.

Eugene has been honored on many occasions, including the Sask Sport Volunteer Award, Softball's Distinguished Service Award and the Dairy Producers Foundation Volunteer Award and his peers in the Canadian Speed Skating Association presented him with an award of excellence in 1987.

His work with the Special Olympic athletes in the 1990s was a continuation of the coaching he had started with prominent deaf skaters, like Norma Jean Taylor and Farley Kellett, and his work with the handicapped children.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 17 of 32. | | |

James Heidt

Jim Heidt became a member of the Saskatoon ski club in 1943 and after a two year stint with the Air Force he returned to the club. All the while he was a member he helped to promote downhill and slalom skiing. In 1947, he and friends helped to enlarge the original club cabin since memberships were on the increase.

In 1950, after taking a special Canadian Ski Instructors course, Jim became Saskatchewan's first qualified downhill ski instructor. In 1963, Heidt embarked on a new venture working with other members to reconstruct the ski jump on the riverbank. Five years later a new site with more challenges for downhill and cross-country skiers had to be found. The club moved to Cranberry Flats. Jim was an active member of the club until 1971 at which time the club donated all its equipment to the Canada Winter Games committee and the new mountain at Blackstrap.

Jim Heidt was inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1988.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 18 of 32. | | |

Ed Henick

Ed Henick was one of the original members of the Saskatoon Hilltops playing in the 1947 and 1948 seasons. In 1948 the club took part in the Western Junior final but lost out to Vancouver. He served as an assistant coach in 1950 and was the club's president in 1963 and 1964. All the while continuing to work for the Hilltops, Henick served two terms as secretary-treasurer of Football Saskatchewan in 1973 and 1974. He also served two terms as president of the Prairie Junior Football League.

Ed was the main force behind the formation and success of the Kinsmen touch and the minor tackle football leagues in Saskatoon. He has remained a director of the Hilltops for many seasons and at game time at the Hilltops home games he can be seen in the ticket booth selling game tickets. Because his work does not finish until the paper work is done, Ed rarely sees the first half of the game.

In 1981, Ed was selected the Kinsman Sportsman of the Year. The following year, the Hilltops honored him with a life membership. In 1986, Henick was selected to the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 19 of 32. | | |

Mel Hepburn

In 1947, at the age of 38 years, Mel Hepburn joined the Saskatoon Figure Skating Club to learn ice dancing. It was the beginning of a remarkable association.

He was president of the Saskatoon Club from 1951 to 1953, club treasurer and club test chairman during the 1950's, chairman or production chairman for the annual ice show for 18 years, was twice treasurer of the Western Canada Section and became a life member of the Saskatoon Club.

He has been a judge of figure skating for 36 years and gave dedicated service to many parts of Saskatchewan, Alberta and Manitoba in the judging field.

In 1980, he organized precision skating in Saskatoon and for eight years, was organizer, manager and trainer of the city's precision teams.

He judged his last competition in August, 1987; his name was given to the Open Precision competition in 1987; and he has continued to serve the Saskatoon Club as archivist and club historian in recent years.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 20 of 32. | | |

Ernest Herlen

Born in Star City, Saskatchewan in 1918, Ossie Herlen was an outstanding sportsman but excelled in boxing. He started to box at the age of fifteen. All told he had 33 fights and won 27 of them, 12 via the knockout route. Of the six fights he lost, five were by decision. In his nine years of boxing, Herlen was never knocked out.

In 1937 Ossie was the Saskatchewan lightweight champion. The following year he was Saskatchewan champion again, this time in the welterweight division. That same year he was a finalist in the Canadian welterweight class. For most of his career, Herlen was trained by the great Bobby Reid. In the 1937-38 year, Ossie was vice-president of the Golden Gloves Amateur Boxing club. In 1940, as a member of the RCAF, Ossie continued boxing and won the Toronto Garrison championship.

He was named to the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1977 and was inducted into the Saskatoon Hall of Fame in 1987.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.


Ernest Osborne (Ossie) Herlen was an excellent boxer and a great sportsman of the late thirties. He was raised in Saskatoon and started to box at the age of fifteen.

Of his 33 fights, Ossie won 12 by decision, 12 by knockouts and three by T.K.O.'s. He lost five by decision and fought to one draw. In the nine years of boxing he was never knocked out.

Ossie was the Saskatchewan lightweight champion in 1937 and in 1938 was a Saskatchewan champion again, only this time in the welterweight class. He was also the Welterweight Dominion Champion in Winnipeg the same year.

Ossie was named Vice President of the Golden Gloves Amateur Boxing Club for 1937-38.

After entering the R.C.A.F., Ossie carried on boxing and took the Toronto Garrison Championship in 1940.

At time of installation citation read March 26, 1977.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

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