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  Prairie Gold:
Sports Heroes From Saskatchewan
 
 
Photo 1 of 21. | | |

Ann Clark / Ann Davis

Basketball and Volleyball (B.A.(P.E.) '65)

Ann (Davis) Clark graduated from Aden Bowman Collegiate in Saskatoon and entered the University of Saskatchewan in the fall of 1961. While at the University of Saskatchewan, she competed in basketball and volleyball for four years.

As a member of the Huskiette basketball team, she led the team to four Conference Championships. During her career, the team compiled an overall record of 67 wins and 19 losses. She was named to man tournament all-star teams including the 1964 Canadian Senior All-Star Championships. As a player she was an excellent inside player and an extremely strong rebounder.

As a Huskiette volleyball player she was an exceptional hitter and was named to many volleyball all-star teams. She also played on a number of provincial teams at national championships.

She was very active in the Women's Athletic Board and the Women's Intramural Board. For her athletic achievements, she was awarded a Major Athletic Award.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame

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Photo 2 of 21. | | |

Barb Danahar

A golfer par excellence, Barbara won her first major event in 1957. Capturing the Saskatoon Riverside club's championship was the first of many awards. All told, she has won 21 ladies' and 2 senior ladies' club championships. She has captured the Saskatoon ladies' crown 16 times and the senior ladies' title twice.

On the Saskatchewan scene, Danahar has won 10 championships. A record that may never be broken, she has represented Saskatchewan in 28 Canadian championships. For 24 years she has made the Saskatchewan ladies team and on 4 occasions she has been on the provincial senior ladies team. In 1985 the Saskatchewan senior women won the Canadian championship. In 1969, Barbara reached the finals of the Canadian open, losing out to Marlene Streit. In 1970 she captained the Canadian team that placed 4th out of 21 countries in the world championships in Madrid.

Barb has been ranked in Canada's top ten three times. In 1967, she was named Saskatoon's Sports woman of the year. She was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1973. She was named to the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 3 of 21. | | |

Bob Dawes

Bob Dawes, who played with the Toronto Maple Leafs when the team won the Stanley Cup in 1949, poses in front of mementos as he reminisces about his career in hockey.

Date: May 10, 1986.

Photographer: Berger, Glen (Star-Phoenix staff)

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Photo 4 of 21. | | |

David Dean

David Dean's involvement with swimming began as coach of Regina's "Y" swim teams in the fifties.

He has been the National Director for the Canadian Amateur Swimming Association (CASA), responsible for officiating at summer and winter nationals between 1878 and 1983, and conducted countless clinics for swimming officials.

He also participated in international meets around the world as a judge: World Championships, Pan American Games and the World Student Games. He acted as starter at the Commonwealth Games in New Zealand.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 5 of 21. | | |


Alex Wuttunee Decotea

Alex Wuttunee Decoteau

Alex Wuttunee Decoteau was born in December, 1887 on the Red Pheasant Reserve, located south of the North Saskatchewan River. He attended the Battleford Industrial School and learned to play such sports as boxing, cricket and football (soccer). The death of his father on February 3, 1891 would cause Alex to remain in school, and later to live with his sister and brother-in-law in Edmonton.

Alex's first race was a one-miler at Fort Saskatchewan on May 24, 1909 in which he came second. On June 29, 1909, Alex won his second competitive race, which was a five-mile feature at the Edmonton Exhibition. Two days later in Lloydminster Alex set a new Western Canadian record in the same event in 27.45.2. Alex would go onto win numerous races throughout Alberta and Saskatchewan. On July 1, 1910 Alex entered the Alberta Provincial Championships in Lethbridge and emerged victorious in the four events he entered - the five mile, the two mile, the one mile, and the half mile. At the Montreal AAA grounds Alex defeated the field in the 5000 meter event, in the time of 15.17.4 to become the only Saskatchewan or Alberta athlete to qualify for the 1912 Olympic games m Stockholm, Sweden. In Stockholm he finished sixth in the 56000 m final. He experienced severed leg cramps early in the final. Alex continued to run after the Olympics and set two Alberta provincial records in the one and two mile events on July 1, 1914.

Beyond Sport Alex:

- Became a member of the Edmonton Police Department in 1909 and is recognized as the first full-blooded Aboriginal person to join a municipal police force in Canada.

- Was promoted to Sergeant on April 11, 1914 and was in charge of the No.4 Police Station on 102 Avenue and 121 Street.

- Has the distinction of being one of the 1st motorcycle policeman in Edmonton.

- He was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame.

-In 1916 he joined the 200th Sportsman Battalion and was later transferred to the 49th Edmonton Regiment. On the 30th of October, 1917 Alex Wuttunee Decoteau was killed at the Battle of Passchindaele by a sniper's bullet. He was 30 years old.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Indian First Nations Sports Hall of Fame.

Date: c1930

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the Saskatchewan Federation of Indian Nations

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Photo 6 of 21. | | |


Harry Dempster

Harry Dempster

Hockey, Football B.E. '32, M.Sc. '34

Harry Dempster came from Prince Albert and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1927.

Harry was a member of the Huskie football team for six years during which time he served as captain of the team for three years. He was considered to be one of Western Canada's outstanding kicking halfs.

He was an outstanding right winger on the Huskie hockey team for four years. He served as captain of the team in 1933-34.

For having participated on a total of ten senior teams, Harry was awarded a major Athletic Award in 1933-34.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Date: 1929

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 7 of 21. | | |

Wilbrod Desjardins

Hockey Bed'85

Willie Desjardins came to the University of Saskatchewan in 1979 from Climax, Saskatchewan.

Willie was a member of the hockey team for five years serving as team captain for two of the years. He was selected a Canada West All Star four times and in 1982 was selected to the CIAU All Canadian Team. A prolific scorer, he led the Huskies in team scoring for three years. During his tenure, the team captured three Canada West Championships and in 1983 he led the team to the CIAU Championship. He was selected the Most Valuable Player in the 1983 CIAU Championships.

In 1981 and 1983 Willie was awarded the E. Kent Phillips Trophy as the University's Outstanding Male Athlete. In 1983 he received the prestigious MacDonald Trophy for leadership, sportsmanship and athletic ability.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan

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Photo 8 of 21. | | |

Phyllis Dewar

While still a school girl in Moose Jaw, Phyllis Dewar dominated all tree style swimming events in Saskatchewan. In fact, in 1934 when she travelled west to the British Empire and Commonwealth Games trials she was already the three-time one mile swimming champion of Saskatchewan. At the trials, however, Miss Dewar was a "prairie unknown". This did not stop her from swimming onto the team and to the Games in London, England.

Meeting the best in the empire at London, Phyllis won four medals (the best performance by any Canadian) as a result of her victories in the 100 yard free style (a new record) and in the 440 yard free style (a new record) and her participation as a member of the medley relay team and the 400 yard relay team, both of which were Canadian first place victories.

In August of this same summer Miss Dewar swam her way to the Canadian women's one mile swimming championship in Toronto, to win the Barker Gold Trophy. She completed the mile race in 29 minutes, 41 seconds. These performances were instrumental in her selection as the Canadian Women Athlete of the Year in 1934.

In 1935 Miss Dewar, set a new record at each of 100 yards, 400 yards, 1,000 yards, 1,500 yards, and set a mile record of 23 minutes and 32 seconds.

Phyllis was a member of the 1936 Canadian Olympic swimming team.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22,1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 9 of 21. | | |

Paul Dojack

As a youth Paul Dojack was instrumental in the formation of the Dales Athletic Club; an organization which spawned many sports teams but most notably the Regina Dales Football Club. He coached this team in four consecutive Western Canadian Junior Championships, and in 1938 led the team to the Canadian Championship.

In 1941, while a member of the Canadian Army, he refereed his first two senior football games. This was the baptism of an official who has come to be recognized as one of Canada's greatest football referees.

As a professional football referee in the Canadian Football League he worked in five hundred and forty-six (546) games. Fourteen of these games were Grey Cup finals: in eight of these he was the head referee. Two record setting Grey Cup Games in which Paul was the head referee were the 1961 overtime game and the "Two-part" fog game of 1962.

His recognition as the top official in the Canadian Football League, led to his being appointed supervisor of the Western Conference of the Canadian Football League following the 1970 football season.

At time of installation citation read September 25, 1971.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 10 of 21. | | |

Danny Donison

Born in the Avonlea District of Saskatchewan in 1932, Danny Donison had an outstanding career in the sport of wrestling, both as an athlete and as a builder.

He began wrestling in 1950 at the old YMCA in Regina, under the tutelage of Roy Ohashi. Between 1953 and 1968 he won six Saskatchewan Championships in the Lightweight, welterweight and middleweight categories. On five occasions he placed second at the Provincial level.

In 1955 he captured the Canadian lightweight title, was second in 1956, and tied for third in 1957.

In 1958 he won the Manitoba Championship as a lightweight, and was given the outstanding wrestler award.

Danny Donison put time and energy into his sport in other ways. Between 1954 and 1965 he coached at the Regina Wrestling Club, and from 1955 to 1960 he was the Chairman of the Wrestling committee for the Saskatchewan Branch of the amateur Athletic Union of Canada.

During his wrestling career Danny was also involved in promoting amateur and free-style wrestling in Regina and communities throughout Saskatchewan. He served for two years as Secretary of the Regina Caps Hockey Club, and from 1955 to 1968 as Secretary-Treasurer of the Regina Boxing and Wrestling Club.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame June 5, 1982.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 11 of 21. | | |

Lee Donison

Lee Donison the eldest of the wrestling Donison brothers, was born March 9, 1928, and raised in the Avonlea, Saskatchewan District.

Although better known as a boxer, he was also an outstanding wrestler. He won the Provincial Heavyweight wrestling championship four consecutive years between 1953 and 1956, placing second in 1957. He won the most outstanding wrestler award at the Provincial Championships in 1954.

As a boxer he won seven provincial titles between 1952 and 1963; as a light heavyweight in 1952 and heavyweight in 1953 to 1957.

He retired from active competition from 1958 to 1962, then won the Provincial and Canadian Light Heavyweight Championship in 1963.

He twice placed second at the National Level - in 1953 as a Heavyweight and in 1954 as a Light Heavyweight, and was chosen as an alternate for the Canadian Team at the 1954 British Empire Games in Vancouver.

Lee Donison is the only athlete in Canada to have won Provincial Titles in both Boxing and Wrestling four times. This was accomplished in successive years between 1953 and 1956.

He also served his sports as provincial Chairman of Boxing and Wrestling in 1953 and 1954, and as chairman of Boxing from 1955 to 1958 and 1962,63.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame June 5, 1982.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 12 of 21. | | |

Sebastien Donison

Butch Donison, the youngest of the Donison brothers, was born near Avonlea, Saskatchewan. His career as a wrestler spanned fifteen years during which time he compiled an outstanding record. He is the only Canadian wrestler to have competed in every weight class in Provincial competition, placing first in all except one.

Between 1953 and 1967 Butch won thirteen Provincial Championships, and placed second on two occasions. At the Canadian level he won titles in 1955 as a featherweight and in 1966 and 1967 as a middle weight. He twice placed second at the Nationals, in 1958 and 1963.

At the 1966 British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Kingston, Jamaica, Butch captured the silver medal in the middle weight division.

Butch attended the University of Denver on an athletic grant and placed second in the conference wrestling championships on three occasions, and second in the Rocky Mountain Region A.A.U. Championships.

After his last Canadian title in 1967 he retired from active competition. In addition to his participation as an athlete he was also involved as a coach at the Regina Wrestling Club between 1965 and 1967 and coached the University of Regina wrestling team in 1968 and 1969.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame June 5, 1982.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 13 of 21. | | |

Ken Doraty

Ken Doraty - the one time "Mighty Atom" of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

In 1925 Ken played with Western Canada's first memorial cup winners - the Regina Pats. He turned pro with Portland, Oregon and was named to the Chicago Blackhawks roster in 1927.

The Toronto Maple Leafs obtained Ken in 1932. That season they played against the Boston Bruins for the championship. After 60 minutes of regular game time and 104 minutes and 46 seconds of overtime, Ken Doraty swept around the great defenseman, Eddie Shore, and shot the puck past goalie Tiny Thompson. The score 1-0 for Toronto. He was the leading goal-getter in this Canadian division Stanley Cup playoff. On January 16, 1934, Ken shot the fastest three goals ever scored in N.H.L. regular season play.

In later years, Ken Doraty, as coach took the Moose Jaw Canucks to the Memorial Cup finals. He moved to Regina as senior mentor and then returned to the Canucks fold to eventually become their president.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on April 1, 1978.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 14 of 21. | | |

Clarence Downey

For 26 years, from 1932 to 1958, Clarence was involved with speed skating. For many years he was a participant, then turned his energies to coaching. Clarence was also a proficient barrel jumper. He was the Western Canadian champion in 1936 and appeared in many shows throughout the West.

In 1943, he took coaching very seriously and he and others formed the Saskatoon Speed Skating club. As its president the club began to grow, and competitive skating returned to the province and Clarence was known as "Mr. Speed Skating" in Saskatchewan. He wrote many articles on coaching and skating. His pamphlet "Helpful Hints on Speed-Skating", was published by the CCM company. Because of his coaching skills he was selected as coach and manager of the 1956 Canadian Olympic Speed-Skating team.

He was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1967. In 1986 he was inducted into the Saskatoon Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.


Clarence Downey over a period of 26 years (1932-58) was active in the sport of speed skating, first as a participant and later and more importantly as a teacher and coach of the sport.

By 1936 Downey was the barrel jumping champion of Western Canada. However, it wasn't until 1943 that his organizational and coaching ability came to the forefront. It was in that year he and others organized the Saskatoon Speed Skating Club. A year later he was its President and within a year competitive speed skating had returned to the province. This had come about largely through his untiring efforts. For the next 14 years, until the time of his death, Clarence Downey was "Mr. Speed Skating" in Saskatchewan.

He wrote training programs, articles on training hints and exercise charts for local use. As well he wrote a coaching booklet which was distributed nationally. Much of his writings became the impetus which caused speed skating to grow both in numbers of participants and in importance in the province.

His excellence as a coach and administrator was recognized by his selection by the Canadian Olympic Association as coach and manager of the 1956 Canadian Olympic Speed Skating team.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22, 1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

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Photo 15 of 21. | | |

Diana Duerkop

Diana Duerkop was born in Kingston, Ontario, in 1941. She was active in high school basketball, track, volleyball and badminton programs and YWCA programs.

She attended Queen's University for four years, swimming and playing intercollegiate basketball for four years.

Diana came to Saskatoon in 1963 at a time when the University of Saskatchewan was designing its aquatic programs to suit the new pool. She ran swimming programs and coached the university's synchronized swimming teams for five years.

She returned to University as a student, graduated in education and became a teacher at Nutana where she coached senior girls' basketball, twice winning provincial titles.

She led the revival of synchronized swimming in Saskatchewan and became president of the Canadian association for a three-year term, starting in 1978.

Diana was named women's team manager for Canada at the Pan-American Games in Venezuela in 1983; assistant chef d'mission for the Pan-American Games in Indianapolis in 1987; and chef d'mission for the Pan-American Games in Havana, Cuba, in 1991.

She enjoyed an eight-year term on the Canadian Olympic Association's executive committee and remains aquatic director for the Canadian Olympic Association.

She owns Westsport Consulting; her husband, John, is principal at Evan Hardy Collegiate and as a teacher, he shares her beliefs in the community and in youth.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 16 of 21. | | |

Denny Dumas

Because Shorty and Denny were pioneers in the sport of marathon canoeing, they were inducted together in 1988. They and their two sons were members of the Great West Auto Body team that placed first in the popular Louis Riel Relay race in 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984 and 1986. When the Canadian marathon canoe championships were held in Saskatoon in 1981, Shorty and Denny placed fifth in the senior men's division. They were third in 1982 and sixth in 1983.

From 1984 to 1986 the pair moved up to the Master Men category and won three successive Canadian titles. Shorty and Denny picked up another victory in the Louis Riel race in 1987 and six days later, while practicing for the Canadian canoe championship, Denny suffered a heart attack and died. Shorty went on to the nationals winning a silver medal in the Masters Singles. In 1988, Shorty won three gold medals and then went on to the USA nationals. In addition to canoeing, Shorty and Denny played Old-timer hockey and took up cross-country skiing.

Both men were inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1988.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 17 of 21. | | |

Karen Dumas

Karen was a highly skilled athlete in the sport of synchronized swimming. She competed for six seasons, then began coaching when the Saskatoon Aqualenes Swimming Club was newly formed. Many of her swimmers placed high in provincial and western Canadian competitions.

When she retired from coaching, Karen joined her husband Denny in a new sport - canoeing. Her first taste of competition took place during the popular Louis Riel relays. Her next venture took her to the sport of Marathon canoeing. Karen encouraged a former synchro-swimmer Cathy Nixon to join her. In August 1981, Karen and Cathy combined to win the pairs event in the first Canadian Women's Championship marathon canoeing held in Saskatoon. The following year in Grandmere, Quebec, this duo again repeated as national champions. Karen's superior strength and endurance was an inspiration to many.

She was inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 18 of 21. | | |

William Dunbar

Born in Kinmount, Ontario in 1895, Bill Dunbar was best known for his curling exploits.

The 1940 fact book for the MacDonald Brier, in which Bill skipped the Saskatchewan rink to a second place finish behind the Howard Wood rink of Manitoba, gave Bill a 'first' in the 13-year history of the brier. He is the first of the nearly 400 curlers who have participated in any of the MacDonald's brier tankard playdowns in the past to have learned his curling in the United States.

Bill was on the Saskatchewan football club in 1921, winning the championship of that year, and while at the University of Saskatchewan won the Saskatchewan high jump, shot put, broad jump, running broad jump, hundred-yard dash and the discuss.

Bill's baseball career spanned over 10 years during the 1920's and 1930's when he played with the Western Canada professional league which was made up of teams from his hometown of Kinley as well as Asquith, Rosetown, Delisle and Neilberg. He was also a prominent member of the Saskatoon rugby team which defeated the Regina Roughriders in the 1923 provincial championship.

Bill's curling exploits continued throughout the 1940's, 1950's and 1960's where he won many bonspiels.

At time of installation citation read March 27, 1976.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 19 of 21. | | |


Maureen DuWors

Maureen DuWors

Maureen has represented Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and Canada in track and field as an athlete, coach and administrator. During her career, she held many Saskatchewan, high school and open records in the 50, 60, 75, and 100 yard sprints. She was also the holder of the Canadian Juvenile long-jump record. Her strong showing in these events helped Maureen make the Canadian team that went to Melbourne, Australia for the 1956 Olympics. She competed in the 100 and 200 metre sprints and the 4 x 100 metre relay team.

While competing in the 4 x 100 relay in the 1958 Commonwealth Games and the 1959 Pan-American Games, she helped Canada win two bronze medals. When her racing days were over Maureen turned to coaching and officiating.

She became an internationally ranked official and served as a director of the Saskatoon Track and Field club, an executive member of the Amateur Athletic Association of Canada, and was a founding member of Sask Sport.

She was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1977 and in 1986 entered the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.


As an athlete, coach, official and administrator, Maureen Duwors has represented Saskatchewan, and Canada, in track and field.

In 1953 Maureen held both the open and high school junior sport titles. In 1955 she was a Canadian champion in the 60 yard and 100 yard events. Throughout the course of her career as an active athlete, Maureen held the Canadian Record for the 50 yard, 60 yard and tied the 100 yard sprint events, as well as the Canadian Juvenile Long Jump record.

In 1956, at the Melbourne Olympics, Maureen ran the 100 metres, 200 metres and the 4x100 metre relay. Maureen held two bronze medals for the 4x100 relay from the Pan American games and the British Empire and Commonwealth Games.

An active participant in sport, Maureen went on to become an official, administrator and internationally rated official. She was an executive member of the Athletic Association of Canada, Saskatchewan branch; a director of the Saskatoon Track and Field Club and was a founding member of Sask Sport.

At time of installation citation read March 26, 1977.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 20 of 21. | | |


Richard DuWors

Richard DuWors

Builder

Richard DuWors, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, graduated from Bates College in Maine and Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Dick joined the University of Saskatchewan in 1957 as head of the Sociology Department. Considered to be the father of track and field at the University, he was an outstanding cross country and track and field coach who developed many fine student-athletes who went on to become leaders in track and field. Among this group were Lyle Sanderson and Dale Yellowlees. He motivated all of his student-athletes to excel both on and oft the track.

He started the University's indoor track and field program with very little equipment and limited training facilities. His vision and drive led to the construction of an indoor track in 1965 which allowed indoor track and field to grow and develop in the province during the winter months. He improvised when it came to training in gymnasiums by utilizing training corners.

He was responsible for the formation of the first Canada West track and field championship held in 1968 and was also instrumental in bringing the first indoor national championship to Saskatoon in 1969. He also played a prominent role in bringing a number of national outdoor championships to Saskatoon such as the 1960 Olympic Games Trials and the 1967 Pan American Games Trials.

His knowledge and work in track and field led to his appointment to serve on the National Fitness and Amateur Sport Advisory Board.

His vision and dream of a field house for Saskatoon became a reality when the Saskatoon Field House opened as part of the Western Canada Summer Games in 1979.

Dr. DuWors passed away unexpectedly in 1979. The Canada West's men's track and field championship trophy is named in honour of Dr. DuWors.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.


Richard (Dick) DuWors was born in Boston, graduated from Bates College in Maine and Harvard University. He came to Saskatoon in 1957 as head of the Sociology Department of the University of Saskatchewan.

Dick was an outstanding cross country coach with the university and started the university's indoor track program with very little equipment and limited training facilities. It was through his leadership that indoor corners were developed for training purposes and that an indoor track was constructed in 1965. He was one of the founders of the Saskatchewan Jubilee Games in 1965, an event which was inherited by the Knights of Columbus the following season. He also started the Western Intercollegiate indoor championships in 1967.

He was also on committees which brought the 1960 Olympic Games trials and the 1967 Pan-American Games trials to Saskatoon.

Dick's great dream was the pursuit of a Field House for year-round track and field training and his dream came true with the completion of the Saskatoon Field House in time for the 1979 Western Canada Summer Games, just before his unexpected death in August, 1979.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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