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Photo 1 of 32. | | |

Harry Bailey

Harry's competitive swimming career began in 1932 and lasted until 1943. For several years he was the Saskatchewan breast-stroke record holder in the 50, 100 and 200 yard events. When he went into coaching, he soon became known as Mr. Swimming. He coached swimmers at all levels from the young splashers right up to the international scene. In addition to being a coach, Harry to many was a teacher, a father, a trainer. He was also known as a stern disciplinarian.

All of these attributes helped his swimmers to hold several Saskatchewan and Canadian records. In 1966 he was voted Saskatoon Kinsmen of the Year. He was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1973. When Saskatoon held its 100th anniversary as a city , Bailey was one of the elite 100 who was honored as a builder.

Saskatoon also honored Harry by naming its indoor swimming facility after him- the Harry Bailey Aquatic Centre. He entered the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.


Harry Bailey is Mr. Swimming in Saskatoon. His competitive career began in 1932 and rose to become provincial breaststroke champion in 50, 100 and 200 yard events establishing records that stood until 1943.

His foremost contribution, however, has been in teaching. The fact that Saskatoon has been and is today a strong competitive swimming centre is due largely to his efforts as a teacher, coach, trainer and stern disciplinarian to hundreds of swimmers and divers.

Through the years his swimmers have been more than successful, the clubs has always held about half of the provincial records and a number of Canadian swimming records.

We know of no other person in Saskatoon who has given so freely of his time for so many years for the good of the youth of that city.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on March 31, 1973.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

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Photo 2 of 32. | | |

Mary Baker

Mary Baker was born in Regina, July 10th, 1919. She has been actively involved in sport in our province since the age 13 when she started playing softball with local minor league teams.

In 1943 when P. K. Wrigley formed his All-American Girls Baseball League, Mary tried out and successfully wound up playing back catcher with the Blue Sox, one of four professional teams.

She proved to all that high-class femininity and high-class ball were a surefire combination. She was the league's most publicized player, often referred to as 'Pretty Bonnie Baker" by the press. She was three times all-star catcher, and later the only full-time woman manager of the Kalamazoo Lassies Ball Club in 1951.

The league emphasized female charm along with talent, and part-time model 'Mary' qualified in all respects.

Returning home after a lengthy career, Mary led the Regina Legion Team to Provincial, Western Canadian and finally World Ladies Softball honours in Toronto.

Mary Baker had the distinct honour of being the first female sports-caster in Canada when she worked for CKRM in 1964-65. She has rivaled men for years in sport endeavours and occupations and has to her credit many 'firsts'.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame on June 22nd, 1985.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 3 of 32. | | |

Gail Bakker

Born April 5th, 1946 Gail was one of Saskatoon's finest gymnasts. At age eleven, she took part in a tumbling program at St. Mary's hall. Mike Matich noticed her working out, and introduced her to the gymnastic program. Chuck Sebestyen also entered the scene and before long Gail was winning medals and ribbons. In 1959, she was Saskatchewan's junior champion, then became Alberta and Western Canadian junior champion in 1960 and 1961. In 1962, she really progressed and after winning the Canadian championship was on the World Games team and competed in an England/Canada meet and the U.S. championships.

The competition in 1963 was tougher but she added the Canadian senior championship to her credit and was on the Pan-American Games team. In 1964 Gail was the only female to go to the Tokyo Games. Because of her excellent showing all year she was awarded the Federation of International Gymnastics Pin and was named Canadian Female Athlete of the Year. After moving to the U.S. she won several collegiate titles and when she left competition she found time to coach, train and officiate.

In 1990 she was named to the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 4 of 32. | | |

Norm Balderston

Saskatchewan has long been a "hotbed" for curling, producing national and world champion athletes and highly respected officials and administrators. Among the many names synonymous with curling in Saskatchewan is Norm Balderston.

Norm's relationship with the "roaring game" began like most others, as a curler at the local rink. The City of Moose Jaw would benefit for 40 years from Balderston's interest in the sport. He served continuously as a member and President of the Board of Directors of the Moose Jaw Curling Club for numerous years. Norm served for seven years as President of the Hillcrest Sports Centre, a facility he was instrumental in constructing. In 1979, he was named to the committee for the World Junior Curling Championships in Moose Jaw and was again on the committee for the World Ladies Curling Championships, which were held in Moose Jaw in 1983. Moose Jaw thanked Norm for his commitment to sport in the community by naming him their 1969 "Citizen of the Year."

Provincially, Balderston was a district umpire for the Saskatchewan Curling Association from 1958 to 1966 and was a member of the association's Board of Directors for the same time period. In 1966, Norm Balderston inherited the job of Secretary Manager of the Saskatchewan Curling Association from "Scotty" Richardson. He would hold this position until 1973, and then became Executive Director until 1980. Balderston recommended many innovative changes during his tenure. He changed the club affiliation fee from individual curler to ice sheet per club. This system proved very successful and many provincial associations and the Canadian Curling Association adopted it. He also inaugurated a change in the northern and southern playdowns to make the provincial playdown an eight team event.

Norm was a member of the National Council of Provincial Curling Association Secretaries, which he helped form in 1969 and served as Chair in 1974 and 1975.

In appreciation for his many years of service, Norm was named an Honorary Life Member of the Saskatchewan Curling Association in 1979 and was inducted into the Canadian Curling Hall of Fame as a Builder in 1988. The "Norm Balderston Team Sportsmanship Award" has been awarded annually at the provincial playdowns since 1980.

Norm Balderston received the coveted "Scotty" Richardson Memorial Award in 1978, presented annually by the Saskatchewan Curling Association to an individual who has contributed their time, talents and efforts toward the growth and development of curling.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 5 of 32. | | |

Bonny Ballantine

Bonny Ballantine, bowling star from Regina, was recognized as the best woman 10 pin bowler in Canada. She received the Sportswoman of the Year award from the Lakeside Lions Club in 1966.

During her impressive career she has been National Ladies 10 pins Singles champion twice, 1966 and 1969. In 1969 she was named to represent Canada at the World Bowling Tournament.

Her consistent high average has earned Bonny many provincial and city singles, doubles and team championships. Installed in the Hall of Fame on March 22, 1975.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 6 of 32. | | |

Phylis Barclay

Phylis Barclay was born in Delisle and moved to Saskatoon with her family in 1926. She attended Buena Vista, Victoria and City Park schools and played school sports like softball, basketball and hockey. Her earliest test in individual sports was in speed skating where she was a silver medallist in a 1932 city half-mile championship.

She started to make an impression on the women's golf scene just as the era of Canadian interprovincial women's team play was being introduced.

She made her first Saskatchewan team in 1948, joining Mabel Palko, Eleanor Van Impe and Renee Robbins on a team which competed at Saint John, New Brunswick. Barclay won the first flight title at the Canadian tournament.

She made the Saskatchewan team on 11 occasions, including 1958 when the Canadian tournament came to the Saskatoon Golf and Country Club.

At the national level, she once played a round against Marlene Stewart Streit of Toronto and once against Ada MacKenzie, who was a six-time Canadian champion.

As well, Barclay was Saskatoon city women's champion in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1962 and she won the Saskatchewan title in 1948, was runner-up in 1949 and 1950 and won the Saskatchewan again in 1951.

She shot a hole-in-one at the Saskatoon Golf and Country Club on May 20, 1969, and within a month, her husband, Howitt, went out and shot one as well.

After moving to Vancouver in 1970, Barclay joined the Fraser View Golf and Country Club and qualified for the British Columbia senior team in 1971.

Barclay was also a member of the Saskatoon rink which won the Saskatchewan women's curling championship in 1952.

Her husband of 54 years learned of his wife's induction into the Saskatoon Hall of Fame in June but died Aug. 6.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 7 of 32. | | |

Leonard Bath

Leonard H. Bath, "Doc" has spent 49 of his 85 years teaching, training and coaching many types of sports to juniors, adults and seniors in the city of Weyburn.

Mr. Bath was a champion track and field athlete in 1908 at Summerset, England where he won the mile, 880 and 440 events. In 1910 he won the six mile cross country Aldershot Command and the North India mile, 220 and six mile cross country in 1911. In 1920 he played soccer in army championships at Yorkshire, England, and was presented with a gold medal by the Queen mother.

In Canada Mr. Bath played soccer and participated in boxing and track and field events before turning to coaching. As a coach he has trained hockey, baseball and softball teams with outstanding success. Many teams he has coached have won local and provincial championships. The Weyburn Canadians were league champions from 1968 to 1972 when they also captured provincial and dominion championships.

Mr. Bath continues as a trainer with the Weyburn Red Wings hockey club and has helped almost all youngsters in sports and swimming, as well as the Old Timer's hockey club. His time and enthusiasm have been given freely.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on March 22, 1975.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 8 of 32. | | |

Sheila Beckie / Sheila Brennan

Basketball BSPE'82

Sheila Brennan graduated from Marian High School in Regina and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1977.

She was a member of the women's basketball team for five years and served as co-captain of the team for three years. Sheila holds the distinction of being selected to the Canada West All Star Team for five consecutive years. She was selected a CIAU All Canadian in 1982. While a student at the University, she was a member of a number of provincial basketball teams and was a member of Canada's National Junior Team for three years.

In 1980 and 1982, Sheila was awarded the Bob Staynor trophy as the University's Outstanding Female Athlete. In 1981 she was awarded the prestigious Valerie Girsberger Trophy for leadership, sportsmanship and academic ability.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame

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Photo 9 of 32. | | |

Dennis Beerling

Dennis has been involved in sport as an official, coach and administrator, devoting time to Softball and Track and Field. With 20 years as a coach in softball, Dennis has guided teams to five provincial championships and with the 1979 Bar K Junior Ladies, a trip to the nationals. Dennis has also been a registered umpire for over 15 years and has served on numerous boards and leagues in fostering softball both locally and internationally.

Dennis has received numerous awards in recognition of his contribution: Award of Excellence in 1982 and Outstanding Service recognition in 1978 from Canadian Amateur Swimming Association and 1981 from the Saskatchewan Amateur Softball Association. In Track and Field, Dennis has been coaching for 25 years along with officiating for 20 years including Olympics, Commonwealth Games and World Student Games duty. He has been involved with numerous other ventures, Saskatchewan Games; Western Canada Games; Sask. Sport; and National Coaching Certificate program.

Dennis was the Saskatoon Kinsmen Sportsman in 1982 and awarded the 100th century award as a builder also in 1982. He was named to the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 10 of 32. | | |


Alfred Bence

Alfred Bence

Tennis, Swimming (B.A. '28, L.L.B. '30)

Alfred Bence was born in Brandon, and lived most of his life in Saskatoon, where he received all his education and practiced law until 1961 when he was appointed Chief Justice of the Queen's Bench Court and moved to Regina.

Alf Bence entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1925 and competed in swimming and tennis.

As a member of the swim team, he competed in the breast stroke and swam as a member of the relay team. During his career as a swimmer the team captured a number of intervarsity meets and he personally captured first place in the breast stroke in 1928 and 1929. Alf was the third individual "to carve a niche" by gaining the coveted award - the Silver Dolphin, given by the University Swimming Club for passing secondary swimming and a life saving test.

As a tennis player, Alf, joined forces with Ellis McMillan and Vera Borland to dominate tennis at the intervarsity, city, provincial and Western Canadian scene. The threesome captured countless individual and doubles titles.

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame.

Date: 1927

Copyright information: Over 50 years old - order from the University of Saskatchewan Archives

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Photo 11 of 32. | | |

Douglas Bentley

Doug Bentley is a native of Delisle, Saskatchewan, played his first hockey in that well-known sporting community. In fact, it was from the Delisle Tigers that he went to Saskatoon to play as a member of the Wesley's Juniors. In the next year, 1937, he was a member of the Moose Jaw Millers senior hockey team.

In 1938 he moved farther west and joined his four brothers as a member of the Drumheller Miners.

When the next season began he was a member of the Chicago Black Hawks. He remained with the Black Hawks during his entire N.H.L. career which concluded with the 1951 season. He played left wing on a line with his brother, Max, and Bill Mosienko. This trio is considered to be one of the All-Time great units of hockey.

During his career with Chicago, Doug Bentley scored 219 goals and 324 assists in regular league play and an additional 9 goals and 8 assists in playoff competition. This prolific point-getter won the league's scoring title in 1942. He was a member of the first All Star team in 194243 and again in 194344, and in the season of 194647. In the 194849 season he was selected to the second All Star team.

Doug Bentley is already a member of Hockey's Hall of Fame having been recognized for his outstanding career by the Hall's Selection Committee in 1964.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22,1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Date: [ca.1964]

Photographer: CFQC staff.

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Photo 12 of 32. | | |

Maxwell Bentley

This member of a very famous sporting family was born in Saskatchewan at Delisle, in 1920. As a teenager he joined the well-known Saskatoon Wesley's Junior hockey team for the 1935-36 season.

Max played for the Drumheller Miners for the 1937-38 and 1939 seasons. At one time during this period there were five members of the Bentley family associated with the Miners.

In the 1940-41 season he tried out with Chicago of the N.H.L. went to Providence and then re-joined his brother, Doug, as a member of the Chicago Black Hawks.

With Chicago, Max centered the famous "Pony Line" composed of his brother, Doug, and Bill Mosienko. The fabulous quality of this line is possibly best indicated by the fact that all three members of the line have been elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame - Max having been elected in 1966. In fact, the members of the line were so successful that the Toronto Maple Leafs gave up five players in a trade which gave them Max Bentley and another player. As a Maple Leaf, Max was instrumental in the Leafs continuation as the Stanley Cup champions in 1948 and 1949. Additionally, Max Bentley was a member of the first N.H.L. All Star team. He won the Lady Byng trophy in 1942-43 and the Hart trophy in 1945-46. During his career he scored 245 goals and 299 assists in league play. His totals for playoff games are 18 goals and 27 assists.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22, 1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Date: 1983.

Photographer: Marjan, Richard (Star Phoenix)

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Photo 13 of 32. | | |

Bud Besse

While Bud was interested in all sports as a youngster he found his true calling by being an official in hockey and softball. From 1952 to 1980, he played softball then became an umpire, a coach and an executive member for both minor and adult leagues. He began refereeing hockey in 1955 in the minor leagues. In the 1960's and the early 1970's he refereed at many levels, junior, senior, university and semi-pro leagues.

Bud is a charter member of the Saskatchewan Amateur Hockey Association's referee division as well as the Saskatoon Referees Association. In 1971 he was elected referee in chief of the S.A.H.A , a position he held for three years. He served on the hockey committee when Saskatoon hosted the Canada Winter Games in 1971. He has acted as a supervisor of officials for the Western Canada Hockey League and has given much of his time to the Saskatoon Minor Hockey Association. Bud was honored as the 1985 Kinsmen Sportsman of the Year.

In 1986 he was inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 14 of 32. | | |

Edmund Bitz

Ed Bitz was born in Leipzig, Saskatchewan on November 20th, 1929. He moved to Saskatoon in 1961 and the following year became the playing coach of a men's team in the Commercial Baseball League. A dislocated shoulder ended his athletic days but in 1963 he turned to umpiring and he has been doing that for over 25 years. Ed has worked ball games on the local front, the provincial scene, nationally and internationally.

He has conducted many umpiring clinics, and devised the first Saskatchewan official's program. He became the first Softball Canada umpire-in-chief, a position he held from 1972 to 1984, and he officiated at 33 national championships. On four occasions he attended umpire schools in the U.S. and was on hand at seven World championships. His knowledge of the game, and his excellence in officiating has taken him to New Zealand, El Salvador, and China, along with many centres in the U.S. and Canada.

For 27 years Ed was a qualified C.A.H.A. referee. In 1982 he was honored by Century Saskatoon and in 1990 was inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 15 of 32. | | |

Clarence Bligh

Clarence Bligh, the founding chairman of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, had a wide and varied career in amateur sport.

As an active participant, he earned a number of provincial boxing and wrestling junior heavyweight championships. In Saskatchewan's jubilee year - 1955 - he is credited with being one of the major forces in attracting the amateur finals in boxing, wrestling and track and field to the province.

During his career with the Regina City Police, he was active in the promotion of Little League baseball in Regina and was also President of the Police Curling and Sports Association.

His contribution to amateur sport earned him the position of President of the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada (Saskatchewan branch) from 1951 to 1955. He was President of the A.A.U. of Canada in 1960.

Clarence Bligh was also involved with the promotion and development of lawn bowling in Regina and the province. In 1949 and again in 1954 he held the office of President of the Saskatchewan Lawn Bowling Association.

In 1972 he was elected President of the Canadian Lawn Bowling Council and was general chairman of the 1973 lawn bowling national championships which were staged in Regina.

In time of Installation citation read March 27,1976.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 16 of 32. | | |

Shelley Bodnar

Basketball BSPE'82, BEd'83

Shelley Bodnar graduated from Aden Bowman Collegiate in Saskatoon and entered the University of Saskatchewan in 1978.

She was a member of the women's basketball team for five years and served as co-captain of the team for one year. She was selected to the Canada West All Star Team in 1979-80. She still holds the team's career record for free throws with 377 points.

While a student at the University, she was a member of Saskatchewan's Junior Women's basketball team in 1981. She captured the City of Saskatoon's Junior Golf Championship in 1979 and 1980.

In 1982 and 1983, Shelley was awarded the prestigious Valerie Girsberger Trophy for leadership, sportsmanship and academic ability

Text courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Wall of Fame

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Photo 17 of 32. | | |

Frank Boehm

Ten pin bowling was almost a forgotten sport in Saskatchewan until Frank Boehm started making his presence felt in the early 1960's.

He won provincial singles championships in 1964, 1965 and 1970 and added the national crown to those titles in 1964 and 1970. At the same time, he was also a strong competitor in doubles competition, winning the provincial crown in three straight years, 1964, 1965 and 1966. He also represented his province in the 1966 national championships in Fort William, but his biggest challenges were yet to come.

Starting in 1967, he was to represent Canada in the World championships on three occasions, Malmo, Sweden, in 1967; Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1970 and Milwaukee, U.S.A., in 1971.

In addition to being a top competitor and consistently high average bowler, he is also a qualified instructor and has helped many bowlers perfect their game. As manager of the Prairie Lanes in Regina from 1962 to 1967, he played a major role in promoting interest and participation in 10 pin bowling.

At time of installation citation read March 27, 1976.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 18 of 32. | | |

Arnie Boldt

Born on September 16, 1957, Arnold Boldt of Saskatoon lost his right leg at the age of three in a grain auger accident. In 1976 he gained international recognition as a track and field star.

The Olympiad for the Disabled was held in Toronto in August of 1976. Arnie Boldt had an outstanding performance bringing International acclaim. He set world records and won Gold Medals in both the high jump and the long jump. In the high jump he cleared 6' 1 1/4" and in the long jump he recorded a mark of 29' 4".

In 1977 and 1978 he won Gold Medals in the jumping events at the Canadian Games for the Physically Disabled, and by early 1980 was jumping over two metres in preparation for the Olympiad. He jumped 2.08 metres on one occasion during the indoor track season.

On a cold, wet day in July 1980 Arnie broke his own world record with a jump of 1.96 metres at the Olympiad for the Disabled in Arnhem in the Netherlands. He was also the Gold Medal winner in the long jump event.

Arnold Boldt was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame on August 27,1977.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, September 13, 1980.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 19 of 32. | | |

Frank Boll

Frank Thorman (Buzz) Boll - the Western Tumbleweed -was regarded as one of the fastest skaters in the N.H.L. during his era.

In his ten year professional career, Buzz played all the forward as well as defensive positions. While he was with the Toronto Maple Leafs he scored a total of 133 goals with over 130 assists in regular season games.

He once held the record for the fastest overtime goal in the N.H.L. playoffs as well as the most goals scored in the playoffs -seven.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on April 1, 1978.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 20 of 32. | | |

Walter Boschuck

Walter Boschuck was the president of the Saskatoon Lions Speed Skating Club at 18. Only a few years later, he was president of the provincial organization.

Wally coached and started clubs across the province: North Battleford (1952), Saskatoon, Prince Albert (1966) and finally Moose Jaw (1968).

In addition to coaching, officiating, fundraising and starting skating programs, Walter Boshuck accompanied an international team to Holland and Norway.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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