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  Prairie Gold:
Sports Heroes From Saskatchewan
 
 
Photo 1 of 28. | | |

Leonard Bath

Leonard H. Bath, "Doc" has spent 49 of his 85 years teaching, training and coaching many types of sports to juniors, adults and seniors in the city of Weyburn.

Mr. Bath was a champion track and field athlete in 1908 at Summerset, England where he won the mile, 880 and 440 events. In 1910 he won the six mile cross country Aldershot Command and the North India mile, 220 and six mile cross country in 1911. In 1920 he played soccer in army championships at Yorkshire, England, and was presented with a gold medal by the Queen mother.

In Canada Mr. Bath played soccer and participated in boxing and track and field events before turning to coaching. As a coach he has trained hockey, baseball and softball teams with outstanding success. Many teams he has coached have won local and provincial championships. The Weyburn Canadians were league champions from 1968 to 1972 when they also captured provincial and dominion championships.

Mr. Bath continues as a trainer with the Weyburn Red Wings hockey club and has helped almost all youngsters in sports and swimming, as well as the Old Timer's hockey club. His time and enthusiasm have been given freely.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on March 22, 1975.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 2 of 28. | | |

Edmund Bitz

Ed Bitz was born in Leipzig, Saskatchewan on November 20th, 1929. He moved to Saskatoon in 1961 and the following year became the playing coach of a men's team in the Commercial Baseball League. A dislocated shoulder ended his athletic days but in 1963 he turned to umpiring and he has been doing that for over 25 years. Ed has worked ball games on the local front, the provincial scene, nationally and internationally.

He has conducted many umpiring clinics, and devised the first Saskatchewan official's program. He became the first Softball Canada umpire-in-chief, a position he held from 1972 to 1984, and he officiated at 33 national championships. On four occasions he attended umpire schools in the U.S. and was on hand at seven World championships. His knowledge of the game, and his excellence in officiating has taken him to New Zealand, El Salvador, and China, along with many centres in the U.S. and Canada.

For 27 years Ed was a qualified C.A.H.A. referee. In 1982 he was honored by Century Saskatoon and in 1990 was inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 3 of 28. | | |

Clarence Bligh

Clarence Bligh, the founding chairman of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, had a wide and varied career in amateur sport.

As an active participant, he earned a number of provincial boxing and wrestling junior heavyweight championships. In Saskatchewan's jubilee year - 1955 - he is credited with being one of the major forces in attracting the amateur finals in boxing, wrestling and track and field to the province.

During his career with the Regina City Police, he was active in the promotion of Little League baseball in Regina and was also President of the Police Curling and Sports Association.

His contribution to amateur sport earned him the position of President of the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada (Saskatchewan branch) from 1951 to 1955. He was President of the A.A.U. of Canada in 1960.

Clarence Bligh was also involved with the promotion and development of lawn bowling in Regina and the province. In 1949 and again in 1954 he held the office of President of the Saskatchewan Lawn Bowling Association.

In 1972 he was elected President of the Canadian Lawn Bowling Council and was general chairman of the 1973 lawn bowling national championships which were staged in Regina.

In time of Installation citation read March 27,1976.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 4 of 28. | | |

Gordon Currie

Gordon Currie is noted as one of the most successful amateur coaches in our country.

In a career that spanned 26 years, Gord coached the Balfour Tech Football team to 8 provincial championships- 6 in succession - the Balfour Tech Hockey team to 3 provincial championships and the Regina Red Sox Baseball team to 4 southern baseball league championships in 6 years.

From 1965 to 1976 Gord coached the Regina Rams Football Club. During this time, the team won 108 of 135 games. Included in this number were 6 Canadian championships; 8 Man-Sask league championships; 7 Western Junior finals and one Alberta Junior league championship. In 1975 Gordon Currie was named the Canadian amateur coach of the year.

Although his record is impressive, Gordon's success as a coach was much more than his won-loss record in hockey, baseball and football. All through his coaching career he inspired his players to excel, to reach beyond what they felt was their limit, to attain the ultimate in whatever it was they were searching for.

Gordon Currie's contribution to amateur sport will be long remembered in Saskatchewan.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on April 1, 1978.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 5 of 28. | | |

Eldon Elliott

Eldon Elliott, born in 1924, began his radio career at CJNB, North Battleford in 1952 as the station's first Sports Director. For over 30 years his voice has been synonymous with amateur sport in northern Saskatchewan.

His extreme interest in youth and sport began early in life, when he actively coached and promoted minor hockey and baseball teams.

Eldon organized the first Northwest Saskatchewan High School Bonspiel, and was instrumental in administering the Canadian School Boys Curling Championship in 1967 in his hometown.

Changing sports, Elliott was responsible for hosting the Canadian Junior Baseball Championships during Homecoming Year. Serving on executives for hockey, baseball and curling, brought him the Kinsmen Sportsman of the Year Award in 1967, and a Citizen of the Year honour in 1972. His work has been recognized by numerous clubs and leagues also.

It has been stated that Eldon Elliott is a sportscaster who gets things done. He is a planner - a great catalyst for improving sports and life in general in his community.

Eldon Elliott has given his time, his energies, his money, and his love to young athletes in return for pride in his community of North Battleford, Saskatchewan.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame on June 22nd, 1985.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 6 of 28. | | |

Norman Fowler

Heck Fowler played baseball, soccer, lacrosse and hockey. By 1908, he was the goalie for the Junior Rovers Hockey Team in Saskatoon.

In 1912 he made his first appearance as a professional with the Saskatoon Pilgrims. In 1916, he signed with the Spokane Canaries, and the following two years he played with the Seattle Metropolitans.

Between 1922 and 1930, Heck played with the Victoria Cougars, the Boston Bruins, the Edmonton Eskimos and the Oakland Sheiks.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Date: June 4, 1983.

Photographer: Blashill, Peter (Star-Phoenix staff)

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Photo 7 of 28. | | |

Emile Francis

Emile "THE CAT" Francis was born September 13th, 1926. Well known throughout the province, his hockey and baseball roots stem from North Battleford. Francis rose from Junior Hockey ranks in Moose Jaw to the Chicago Blackhawks at the tender age of 20.

In goal from 1947 to 1950, six NHL teams used six goalies, they could afford no backups. The quick reflexes of Emile earned him the nickname CAT.

Francis played in the AHL and WHL, winning the most valuable player award on the all-star team with Vancouver in 1952, and he was named to the all-star team with Cleveland four times.

Retiring in 1960, Francis coached and managed baseball. This was his second love. During his years with the North Battleford Beavers, the club won 6 championships and represented Canada in the Global World Series He returned to hockey in 1967, remaining with the New York Rangers until 1975. Joining the St. Louis Blues organization, he spent 7 years with the Blues before moving on to the position of President and General Manager of the Hartford Whalers.

Emile Francis has 33 years involvement with the NHL, as an impressive player, a respected coach, manager and president. A credit to Saskatchewan and to hockey, congratulations Emile.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame June 17, 1989.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 8 of 28. | | |

Frank Germann

Born in Qu'Appelle, September 27th, 1922, sport began for Frank when he entered Notre Dame college at age 13. As a student, he played and coached baseball, football and hockey. 51 years later he is still involved with sport, coaching, and with Notre Dame.

The war years saw Frank a member of the first Canadian parachute Battalion; he left Saskatchewan for three years to serve his country. He returned as a teacher, a coach and athletic director.

In the fifties Germann left Wilcox a second time for Nova Scotia, obtaining his masters degree in English at St. Francis Xavier University. While there he introduced football to a college that had 100 years of rugby background. Returning home, he returned to his two great loves, coaching and Notre Dame college.

Germann succeeded Pere Murray on the S.A.H.A., he established the referee division, and became referee-in-chief for five years. Serving as S.A.H.A. President 1964-67, he was instrumental in the development of the coaches division and subsequent training programs.

Germann has received life membership in the S.A.H.A. as well as the C.A.H.A. "meritorious award" in 1978. He was a founding member of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, and has served his home province well.

Congratulations! Frank Germann.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 9 of 28. | | |

Stanley Gutheridge

Stanley Herbert Gutheridge, more commonly known as Hub, has been involved in basketball as a player, coach, administrator and official for over 50 years.

Hub first played basketball in the Moose Jaw YMCA about 1919 at the age of 14. He took part in the Y house league, then in the men's city league and later in inter-city competition with Regina. In 1940, Hub played for a team in the King's Own Rifles of Canada. After discharge from the Canadian Army, he became a playing coach for a team of veterans sponsored by the B.E.S.L. (Royal Canadian Legion) in the Moose Jaw league. In 1946, Hub was appointed supervisor of physical education for the Moose Jaw public School Board. In this capacity, he organized and administered all basketball for elementary and secondary schools, and could be given credit for much of the success of the game of basketball in Moose Jaw. Hub started officiating basketball in 1925, and in 1950, be became a certified "A" class official with the I.A.A.B.O.

Hub has also a long career of service to many other organizations, and in recognition of this has been awarded Honorary Membership in the Canadian Red Cross Society, the Saskatchewan Branch of the Royal Life Saving Society of Canada and the Saskatchewan Parks and Recreation Association. During the first Saskatchewan Games held at Moose Jaw in 1972, "Gutheridge Field", a track and field and football stadium, was dedicated in his honour.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on March 24, 1979.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 10 of 28. | | |

Jack Hamilton

The "Builder in Athletics" usually plays many executive roles and Jack Hamilton is the personification of this statement.

As an executive member, Jack was associated with baseball and hockey teams in Southern Saskatchewan as well as acting on a Western Canadian rugby football rules committee for six years, and as a member of the Canadian Olympic Committee for 17 years and as a governor of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League.

Jack Hamilton was the president of the Saskatchewan Amateur Hockey Association 1926-27, the Saskatchewan Branch of the A.A.U. of Canada 1928, Canadian Amateur Hockey Association 1931-32, the Saskatchewan Amateur Basketball Association 1933-34, and A.A.U. of Canada 1937-38. It should be noted that to date only one other person has held the Presidency of both the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association and the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada.

His efforts on behalf of others have been recognized by his life membership in the Saskatchewan Hockey Association, buy his coronation medal awarded by King George VI and by his recognition by the province of Saskatchewan during the 1955 Jubilee Celebration and by his selection in 1967 as the Regina Optimist Club Senior Sportsman.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22, 1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 11 of 28. | | |

Roly Howes

Roly was born in 1897 at Indian Head. Later he moved to Saskatoon and became owner and manager of Birney's hardware. For years Birney's was the favorite gathering spot for sportsmen. He is best known for his community service and contributions to amateur sport development. In recognition of his many contributions, Roly was made an honorary Life member of the Saskatchewan Amateur Softball Association, and the Saskatoon Hilltop football club.

His organizational ability was evident in the success of the annual Saskatoon Exhibition Baseball Tournament during the 1940's, 1950's and the early 1960's. Not only was he generous with his time, but also his money. Roly was the recipient of the first Kinsmen Sportsman of the Year award in 1961. In 1974, he was selected to the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and in 1985 was inducted into the Saskatchewan Baseball Hall of Fame.

In 1986 he entered the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.


Roly Howes is best known for his community service and his contributions to the development of amateur sport in Saskatchewan. He has served as President of a number of community and sport organizations and is an avid supporter of the Saskatoon Hilltops Football Club, the Saskatoon City Police Boys Rifle Club, and the Fish and Game League. Mr. Howes is also an Honorary Life Member of the Saskatchewan Amateur Softball Association and the Saskatoon Optimist Club. The success of the annual Saskatoon Exhibition Baseball Tournament during the forties, fifties and early sixties can be attributed to his dedication to that sport.

Well known for his generosity and influence, Mr. Howes was able to provide assistance and a number of scholarships to a great many teams and individuals, and it is in recognition of these accomplishments that he has been made a member of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on March 30, 1974.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

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Photo 12 of 28. | | |

Hub City Ramblers

Western Canadian Senior Women's Champions, 1955

Back Row: Mac McKee (Coach), Marlene (Gartley) Farrell, Anne (Heshka) Luchanko, Jean (Heshka) Yaremko, Elenor Callow, Shirley Coben, Grace Jasper, Gil Strumm (Head Coach).

Front Row: Donna McKee, Beth (Britton) Brack, Sylvia Fedoruk, Lila Green, Joyce McKee, Audrey (Campbell) Coben, (missing - Hazel Miner).

In 1955, the Ramblers after capturing the Saskatoon title went on to the Northern Playoffs and beat Prince Albert. In the provincial championship, Shirley Coben won two games and relieved the third game, as the Ramblers beat the Regina Govins in a series that went the full five games.

Saskatoon hosted the Vancouver Kerrys for the right to go to Winnipeg for the Western Championship. Ramblers won both games with scores of 12-3 and 12-0. In Winnipeg, Saskatoon lost the opener, 7-6, Then made a spectacular comeback with a 4-0 score in the evening series. The Ramblers went on to win game three with a score of 12-5. They trailed in game four, until the ninth inning when the Ramblers rallied to win the game. This victory earned them the series and the Western Canadian Title. They were inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1989.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

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Photo 13 of 28. | | |

Imperial 400's Fastball Club

Canadian Junior Fastball Champions, 1978

The Saskatoon Imperial 400's fastball club has a long history of success. The nucleus of this club has been together since 1966. Twelve years later the Imperial 400's won the Canadian Junior championship. From 1973 to 1978, this team coached by Bill Gautschi (head coach) and Rick Capon won the Saskatoon City "A" title. In 1976 they represented Saskatoon Zone 6 at the Saskatchewan Summer games. In 1977 the club won the Saskatchewan Junior title, then hosted the Canadian championship. Tim Bashforth won the most valuable player award.

In 1978 when St. John's, Newfoundland hosted the Canadian championship, the Saskatoon Imperial 400's were there again, this time winning it all. Catcher Jay Sim was named to the All-Star team. This team was named to the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.

Members of the team that year: Cec Thompson, Laura Thompson (managers), Rick Capon (coach), Graham Mazurek, John Pulles, Jay Sim, Alvin Willard, David Redekop, Tim Bashforth, Bill Gautschi (head coach), Ron Yourk (bat boy), Gene Layton, Sid Holubetz, Blake Johnson, Doug Durnford, Pat Spizawka, Glen Zacharias, Jack Roberts, Jay Yourk and Don Capon.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers

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Photo 14 of 28. | | |

Jack McLeod

Jack McLeod was born in Regina on April 30, 1930, and became one of Saskatchewan's best two-sport athletes.

In baseball, he played junior at Gull Lake, senior with Swift Current, Moose Jaw and Eston and semi-pro with North Battleford and Saskatoon.

He played junior hockey for Notre Dame Hounds and Moose Jaw Canucks, professional for the New York Rangers, Saskatoon Quakers, Cincinnati, Vancouver and Calgary, senior with Moose Jaw, Saskatoon and Trail and competed three times in the world hockey championships.

His first coaching experiences in hockey were with Saskatoon's senior Quakers in 1958-59, Moose Jaw's senior Plamors in 1961-62 and Moose Jaw's junior Canucks in 1964-65.

He was invited to become coach and manager of Canada's National team from the fall of 1965 until the team disbanded in December, 1970. One of his big thrills was coaching Canada to victory over the Soviets in the Centennial Cup series in 1967. Canadian teams went twice a year to Europe during McLeod's days at the helm.

McLeod joined the Saskatoon Blades in 1970, serving as general manager until 1980 and coaching for most of the seasons as well. They were the Western Hockey League's east division champions three times, 1973, 1975 and 1976, and the club also had three second-place finishes. His record over the nine years as a coach was 291 wins, 238 losses and 72 ties for a winning percentage of .544. He has more victories than any other coach in Blade history. During his time with the Saskatoon club, the Blades sent more players to the National Hockey League than any other junior team in Canada.

McLeod and his wife, Bev, live in Saskatoon and they have two children.

Text courtesy of Ned Powers.

Date: October 8, 1958.

Photographer: Hillyard, Leonard A.

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Photo 15 of 28. | | |

Athol Murray

Best known as "Pere", Monsignor Murray has been a figure of respect in athletics both to his boys and to the members of the sporting fraternity for many years. When he became parish priest at Wilcox in 1927 he took some of the Argos Sports Club boys along with him. The priest and boys became the genesis of Notre Dame College and the famous teams of that college who carried the name of the "Hounds".

In the early days and for many subsequent years Father Murray was the coach of the Hounds as they played football, hockey and baseball. In each instance the Hounds won many provincial championships and scores of Southern Saskatchewan championships. It was something to be a "Hound" and their coach, who was also their advisor, their teacher and their priest, taught some of his best lessons and had some of his most profound influences through athletics. These were lessons in sportsmanship, in good citizenship, in the humanities and in patriotism.

In later years Monsignor Murray has become an even more potent force in athletics as he has played the role of executive member and wise counselor to various athletic organizations in the province and in Canada.

Monsignor Murray has been the recipient of many honors and recognitions from the world of sports. Still his most significant honor is the way old Hounds pay homage to their mentor and Pere.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on May 22, 1967.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

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Photo 16 of 28. | | |

Arthur Obey

Art Obey is best known as a builder and leader in the area of recreation and sport. He was born on November 25, 1931 on the Piapot Reserve. Art attended the Lebret Indian School in the 40's and also Notre Dame College in Wilcox for one year. After school Art became the boy's supervisor at the Lebret Indian School. He married Yvonne Adams of Fort Qu'Appelle on July 7, 1952 and together they raised 9 children.

Art was also heavily into coaching. He was 1955-1959 Coach of Lebret Indians Junior "B" Hockey Champions, 1957-1958 Coach of Lebret Indian Juvenile "C" Hockey Champions and the Midget "C" Champions, 1958-1959 Coach of Lebret Indians Juvenile "B" Champions, and 1959 Coach of Lebret Indians High School Basketball "B" Champions.

As an athlete, Art was a well-known baseball pitcher and was recruited and played for many teams including Notre Dame Hounds, Balcarres Braves, and the Fort Qu'Appelle Sioux and he was a member of the Intermediate "C" Provincial Hockey Champion, the Fort Qu'Appelle Sioux Indians (1956-57). In 1951 Art received the Tom Longboat medal for the best Indian athlete in Saskatchewan; and in 1960 Art received the Tom Longboat Trophy for the best Indian Athlete in Canada.

Art Obey will be known and respected throughout Saskatchewan by the people who have come to know him through his work. The Saskatchewan Indian Recreation movement, in many instances, reflects the quiet but determined personality of this man.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Indian First Nations Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 17 of 28. | | |

Cas Pielak

Mention baseball in Saskatchewan and the name CAS PIELAK is bound to be recognized.

Pielak is largely responsible for baseball being a demonstration sport in the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, Korea. It took a tremendous amount of hard work, and Cas has spent untold volunteer hours spearheading this project - but it was worth it.

Cas became involved in baseball in the coaching end of the sport when he moved to Regina from his birthplace Candiac, Saskatchewan. As a youngster he participated actively in all sports in his home town, but baseball was to become his real love.

As in all organizations, when you do a good job of one thing, there is always another opportunity waiting on the horizon. By 1967, Pielak was President of the Columbus Park Board, then he went on to serve as President of the Columbus Boy's Baseball League. Possessing great expertise and skills, Pielak was soon installed in the President's chair for the Saskatchewan Baseball Association. The next step of course was a natural, to executive positions at the Western Canada level and then on to Baseball Canada.

Pielak served well in all positions, remaining as National President for ten years, 1975 through 1985. He represented Canada on the International level as Vice-President of International Baseball from 1976 to 1984. In 1984, Cas became Secretary-General of the International Baseball Association. He has agreed to continue his relationship with the World-governing body until the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. It is believed at this time that Pielak is the only person from Saskatchewan to be currently serving an executive position on an international sports body.

Pielak hosted an International Baseball Association meeting in Regina in 1988. It was the first time a meeting of the IBA had been held in Canada. Encouraged by the Government of Saskatchewan and the Honorable Colin Maxwell and supported by Sask Sport and Saskatchewan Lotteries, representatives from thirteen countries met in our Queen City. Following this meeting three international championships were awarded to Canada.

Cas was a founding member of Sask Sport. Through his untiring efforts, the basis for what we have in the province today were set. He served his stint on the Western Canada Lotteries Foundation, and helped set up the magnificent organization we have in place now.

Pielak is a credit to Saskatchewan and to Canada. Not only did he play a large role in sport and baseball in our province, but he must be congratulated for his endeavors in aiding tourism for our province and our country.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 18 of 28. | | |

Peter Prediger

During an athletic career spanning more than 40 years, Pete Prediger became known as an outstanding competitor, coach and official in baseball and hockey.

He was a regular team member of the Neilberg Monarchs for 38 years. He played with them at the Saskatoon Exhibition Baseball Tournament for a remarkable 34 consecutive years. He was a member of the team in 1934, 1935, 1936, 1939 and 1941 when they won the tournament. For a brief period Pete played with the North Battleford Beavers in the Western Canada Baseball League.

He also toured overseas with Krefield Canadians in 1936 for a series of hockey tournaments.

An outstanding citizen, Pete was active in civic and community and legion affairs. He coached baseball, softball and hockey for more than 20 years at the command level.

At time of installation citation read March 22, 1975.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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Photo 19 of 28. | | |


Terry Puhl

Terry Puhl

Melville native, Terry Puhl excelled at a variety of sports, but it was his baseball skill that garnered the most attention. Puhl led Melville teams at the Sandlot, Bantam and Midget levels to four provincial championships. The 1971 Melville Lions bantam baseball team won the Western Canadian Bantam Championship and Terry was named MVP. In 1973, Terry led the Melville Elks midget team to the Canadian National Midget Championship and was again named MVP.

Terry signed as a free agent with the Houston Astros in 1973, at the age of 17, and spent four years in the minor leagues prior to be calling up by the Astros. Puhl got his first hit in the first game he started and followed it with 1,360 more in his career. Over 15 years, Puhl played in 1,531 games, had a lifetime batting average of .280, hit 62 home runs, batted in 435 runs and stole 217 bases. Injuries in 1985, 1986 and 1991 greatly reduced his impressive career statistics.

Highlights of Terry Puhl's career must include his selection to the National League (NL) All-Star Team in 1978, being named Canadian Baseball Player of the Year in 1981 and the Astros winning the 1980 NL West Division championship for the first time. Puhl set a NL championship series record that year by batting an incredible .526 in a losing cause. Terry was part of a nucleus of ball players that allowed the Astros to be a consistent contender during the late 1970s and early 1980s.

But it is undoubtedly Terry Puhl's impenetrable defence and undying work ethic that will be best remembered. Over thirteen full seasons, he maintained a fielding percentage of .993, making only 18 errors in 2,596 chances, the best average of any outfielder in baseball history. Puhl presently holds the record for most games played (1,531) and most hits (1,361) by a Canadian born baseball player.

Installed in the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and Museum on June 18, 1994.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.

Date: 1994

Copyright information: University of Saskatchewan

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Photo 20 of 28. | | |

Bobby Reid

Bobby Reid was born in 1890 in Hamilton, Scotland and has been active in sport ever since coming to Saskatoon in 1913.

From 1914 to 1926, he played soccer with the Saskatoon Thistles, the CNR soccer club, and the Fifth Battalion soccer club. In 1916, he boxed for and was also the physical instructor for the 96th Highlanders. His next 16 months were spent in the employ of the New York America's hockey team as trainer and physio-therapist. Upon returning to Saskatoon in 1935, Bobby was active as a player, coach, trainer, manager, and administrator of many local sports until his recent retirement. This activity included involvement with boxer Ozzie Herlen, Golden Gloves Boxing Club, Theatricles Soccer Club, Saskatoon Thistles Soccer Club, Maymount Rangers, Saskatoon Hearts Soccer Club, Legion Soccer Club, Saskatoon Ahepa Soccer Club, Gems Girls Fastball Team, Saskatoon Hilltops Amateur Football Junior Team, Adilman Aces Basketball Team, and the Saskatoon Commodores Amateur Baseball Team.

Installed in the Hall of Fame on March 24,1979.

Text courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

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