Saskatoon Public Library  
     
  Saskatoon Through the Ages:
selected photographs from Local History Gallery Shows
 
     
 

Photo 1 of 28 | | |

2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Sod houses, boom-time mansions, wartime houses and suburban bungalows are all represented in this historical survey of housing in Saskatoon. Drawing from the extensive collection of historical photographs in the Local History Room at Saskatoon Public Library, this exhibition examines various styles of domestic architecture through the decades. The grand homes of the rich and famous as well as the modest bungalows of the ordinary family provide a portrait of how people lived in Saskatoon in the past.

Original gallery show (2006) curated by: R. Jaremko.

With the assistance of: C. Brown, M. Hendry, M.E. Schnitzler, K. Snider, B. Baier, J. Broughton and L. Stark.



2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

An unidentified family poses in front of their home. Built of a combination of lumber, logs and sod, the first shelter of early settlers was often a sod house or "soddie". John Conn who came to Saskatoon in 1883 erected its first building, a sod house on the riverbank east of the Broadway Bridge.

Date: [ca. 1883]

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Photo 2 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Built in 1885 for Silas Lake, the Temperance Colony's first school classes were held in the house with the children sitting on home-made benches. Grace Fletcher bought the house located at 438 Main Street in 1891 and later operated it as a boarding house for women. The women in the photograph have been identified as Allie Thompson, Grace Fletcher, Jennie Howell and Nina Fletcher McLean.

Date: [ca. 1900]

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Photo 3 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Likely constructed in 1902 the house at 502 - 11th Street East was the home of George Herber Clare, Saskatoon realtor and partner in the Irvine and Clare General Store at Broadway and Main. The house was originally numbered 500 11th Street East. The Clares would only live in the house for 10 years before moving into a larger home next door.

Date: [ca. 1910]

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Photo 4 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

When it was built between 1901-1903, James Clinkskill's home on Spadina Crescent at 19th Street was one of the city's finest. Clinkskill later reminisced, "In the absence of a local architect, I procured a book of architect's sketches, selecting the style of house we fancied. I proceeded to draw my own plans, let a contract for the labour, I supplying all the material, and had a commodious comfortable home erected at a cost of $6,000."

Date: [between 1900 and 1903]

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Photo 5 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

This interior view of James Clinkskill's home at 157 Spadina Crescent shows the living room and part of the dining room in 1911. The main floor also had a breakfast room, a bedroom and the kitchen. Upstairs were five bedrooms and a bathroom. The room with the bay window on the second floor was Clinkskill's study. From it he had a fine view of the river.

Date: 1911.

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Photo 6 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

The brick house at 436 Spadina Crescent East near 20th Street was home to businessman W.W. Ashley and his family from 1909 to 1911. President of the Saskatoon Horticulural Society and an active member of the Saskatoon Parks Board, Ashley was instrumental in the city beautiful campaign. For almost twenty years the house would be home to the John Philion family. It would be demolished to make way for the construction of the St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church.

Date: [ca. 1908]

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Photo 7 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

An unidentified family in formal dress surveys the luxuriant growth in their backyard garden. Every inch of ground has been planted with beans climbing on the outbuildings and sunflowers taller than the standing men.

Date: [before 1940]

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Photo 8 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

The Bowerman home at 1328 Avenue K South was built in 1907 as a summer residence for Allan Bowerman, at one time Sasktoon's wealthiest citizen. Designed by architect Walter Lachance, the house has elements of the Western stick style. Bowerman would live in the house until 1923. When the Sanitorium opening in 1925, the house became home to superintendent Dr. H.C. Boughton. He and his family would live in the house until 1959.

Date: [ca. 1908]

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Photo 9 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Udo Schrader and daughter Leonora sit on the front steps of their home at 321 6th Avenue North in this 1916 photograph. Constructed in 1908 for Mrs. Leonora Mallory in a style common to the American Midwest, the house originally cost $20,000. Members of the Mallory and Schrader family would live in the house for over seven decades.

Date: [ca 1916]

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Photo 10 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Rachel and William Stephenson sit on the front porch of their home at 311 - 11th Street East. Built in 1910 for George Thompson, editor of the Capital, the house was renumbered to 313 in 1913. The Stephenson family would live in the house from 1912 until 1937. The Stephensons had come to Saskatoon in 1886 where William worked as a stonemason and Rachel ran the Locksley Hall boarding house.

Date: [between 1912 and 1913]

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Photo 11 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

The Archie P. McNab house, long a landmark in Saskatoon, stood on a commanding location at 706 Melrose Avenue and 11th Street. McNab was for many years a member of the provincial legislature and later Saskatchewan's Lieutenant-Governor. Built in 1909 by McNab the house was sublet into seven suites in the early 30's. It later was operated by the Salvation Army as the Bethany Hospital for unwed mothers. The building was razed in 1969 to make way for apartments.

Date: [ca. 1910]

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Photo 12 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

In a city of beautiful homes the house at 307 Saskatchewan Crescent West dominates. Construction on William Hopkin's mansion began in 1910 when he was mayor of Saskatoon. Two years later the brick castle with its huge pillars and sweeping balconies was finished at a cost of $50,000. Long the centre of Saskatoon's social life, the house would fall on hard times in 1938 when it was sold and converted into an apartment block. Restoration of the house began in 1982.

Date: [between 1912 and 1916]

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Photo 13 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Constructed by architect Frank P. Martin for his own use in 1926, the house at 716-718 Saskatchewan Crescent East was built as a semi-detached dwelling to provide income in difficult times. Concrete pile forms from the construction of the University Bridge were used to provide a sound foundation on land that was marshy. Frank J. Martin, the son of Frank P. Martin would later gain title to the house.

Date: [after 1926]

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Photo 14 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Katherine Wen sits on the steps of the Wen family home at 404 Avenue L North near Westmount school. Typical of low income housing of the period, the wood shingle-sided house was constructed by her father, John Wen in 1927. John Wen had come to Saskatoon in 1908 working as a labourer. He would work for the Canadian National Railway until retirement in 1952.

Date: [193-]

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Photo 15 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

With its stone trimmed fan arched windows, ornate iron balcony and chimney, Leon Prescesky's Elliot Street home was assessed in 1931 as being "far beyond ordinary." Prescesky, the manager of Saskatoon Contracting built his house at 1138 Elliott Street in 1931. Former Mayor and Senator, Sydney Buckwold would live in the house from 1946-1969.

Date: [after 1931]

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Photo 16 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

In 1932 Ethel Howie's new house at 1345 Elliott Street was distinguished from its neighbours by the undulating curves of its simulated thatch roof. The house's longest term resident was Dr. Joseph J. Schacter, a pioneer dentist and orthodontist who practised from 1937 until retiring in 1972.

Date: [ca. 1932]

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Photo 17 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Mr. and Mrs. John Clark pose in front of their charming bungalow and well maintained yard at 740 Avenue I South. Constructed in 1929-30 the Clarks would live in the home until 1966. It would then become the home of William and Mary Panasiuk.

Date: [after 1929]

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Photo 18 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

The back lawn of Saskatoon industrialist Fred Mendel's home at 303 Saskatchewan Crescent West provided the setting for this garden party for wives attending the convention of the Saskatoon branch of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association. Gracious and charming hosts, the Mendel's played host to many large functions and parties.

Date: [194-]

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Photo 19 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

In the 1940's in response to a nationwide housing crisis, some 800 wartime houses were contracted for between Saskatoon and federal housing agencies. Originally meant for war veterans or their widows, these assembly-line wartime houses were built to a narrow-range of designs. Their traces remain in various residential areas. This home was at 1719 Victoria Avenue.

Date: [ca. 1950]

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Photo 20 of 28 | | |


2006 - Saskatoon House & Garden: A Photographic Survey

Luella Thiessen and her daughter Melody enjoy the garden behind their wartime house at 1414 - 10th Avenue North. Other wartime houses are visible across the alley. Some 40 houses were constructed in the North Park area under the 1947 Wartime Housing programme. The Thiessen family moved into their home in 1957.

Date: August 1964.

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